Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Simple Sea Sponge Helps Scientists Understand Tissue Rejection

Date:
August 19, 2005
Source:
Marine Biological Laboratory
Summary:
Xavier Fernŕndez-Busquets, an MBL researcher visiting from the University of Barcelona, has found the perfect ally in this quest Understanding why some transplant patients reject their new organs - the red beard sea sponge.

The red beard sponge.
Credit: Image courtesy of Marine Biological Laboratory

Understanding why some transplant patients reject their neworgans requires a working knowledge of how cells recognize and acceptor reject each other. Xavier Fernŕndez-Busquets, an MBL researchervisiting from the University of Barcelona, has found the perfect allyin this quest: the red beard sea sponge, an Atlantic species that growsabundantly from just north of Cape Cod down to Florida.

Related Articles


The redbeard sponge (Microciona prolifera) has a cell-to-cell recognitionsystem that, on a basic level, is similar to that of humans but muchsimpler. It’s also a good organism for laboratory research, since itscells and cell adhesion molecules can be isolated with simple, fast,and non-disruptive methods and studied, and because its fingerlikestructures make grafting experiments relatively straightforward.

Inexperiments carried out on these sponges this summer, Dr.Fernŕndez-Busquets and his colleagues are studying the cells andmolecules believed to be involved in the process of tissue rejection.By grafting together pieces of different individual sponges that willreject each other—a process that approximates what sometimes happens inhuman transplants—the scientists have observed that cells known as graycells migrate to and amass at the graft site, a clear suggestion thatthey are involved in non-self tissue recognition and rejection.Researchers believe that gray cells may be a primitive form of ourimmune system’s human killer cells.

Fernŕndez-Busquets has alsobeen researching the role of the molecule called aggregation factorproteoglycan, which he has recently identified as another potentialplayer in sponge tissue rejection reactions, and which is very easy tostudy in sponges. The human version of this molecule, which isdifferent from the sponge version but similar in structure, is alsobelieved to have important functions in cell-to-cell interactions, butis hard to study.

The ultimate goal of this research is toprovide insights into the machinery behind human tissue rejection andimmune responses in hopes of someday being able to control theseprocesses and save lives.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Marine Biological Laboratory. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Marine Biological Laboratory. "Simple Sea Sponge Helps Scientists Understand Tissue Rejection." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 19 August 2005. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/08/050819094409.htm>.
Marine Biological Laboratory. (2005, August 19). Simple Sea Sponge Helps Scientists Understand Tissue Rejection. ScienceDaily. Retrieved December 22, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/08/050819094409.htm
Marine Biological Laboratory. "Simple Sea Sponge Helps Scientists Understand Tissue Rejection." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/08/050819094409.htm (accessed December 22, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Plants & Animals News

Monday, December 22, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Christmas Kissing Good for Health

Christmas Kissing Good for Health

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Dec. 22, 2014) — Scientists in Amsterdam say couples transfer tens of millions of microbes when they kiss, encouraging healthy exposure to bacteria. Suzannah Butcher reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Brain-Dwelling Tapeworm Reveals Genetic Secrets

Brain-Dwelling Tapeworm Reveals Genetic Secrets

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Dec. 22, 2014) — Cambridge scientists have unravelled the genetic code of a rare tapeworm that lived inside a patient's brain for at least four year. Researchers hope it will present new opportunities to diagnose and treat this invasive parasite. Matthew Stock reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Earthworms Provide Cancer-Fighting Bacteria

Earthworms Provide Cancer-Fighting Bacteria

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Dec. 21, 2014) — Polish scientists isolate bacteria from earthworm intestines which they say may be used in antibiotics and cancer treatments. Suzannah Butcher reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Existing Chemical Compounds Could Revive Failing Antibiotics, Says Danish Scientist

Existing Chemical Compounds Could Revive Failing Antibiotics, Says Danish Scientist

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Dec. 21, 2014) — A team of scientists led by Danish chemist Jorn Christensen says they have isolated two chemical compounds within an existing antipsychotic medication that could be used to help a range of failing antibiotics work against killer bacterial infections, such as Tuberculosis. Jim Drury went to meet him. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories

 

Plants & Animals

Earth & Climate

Fossils & Ruins

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins