Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Chemical Compound Inhibits Tumor Growth, Size In New Mouse Study

Date:
August 31, 2005
Source:
American Chemical Society
Summary:
A chemical compound that prevents cancer cells from producing a membrane component has been shown to suppress tumor growth in mice, according to researchers at the Children's National Medical Center in Washington, D.C. The finding could lead to the development of safe and effective human cancer treatments that don't have the harsh side effects. The findings will be presented Aug. 30 at the national meeting of the American Chemical Society.

The compound, a carbohydrate known as OGT2378, blocks the production of an enzyme that cancer cells need to make gangliosides, molecules found in the membranes of most cells. When secreted by cancer cells, gangliosides suppress the immune system, alter the microenvironment surrounding these cells and promote the growth of new blood vessels necessary for tumor growth and survival.

"Cancer cells produce gangliosides at a much more rapid rate than normal cells. By interfering with this process we can stop a tumor from growing in a rather dramatic fashion without damaging the normal tissue surrounding it," says Stephan Ladisch, M.D., director of the Center for Cancer and Immunology Research at the Children’s Research Institute. His findings were presented today at the 230th national meeting of the American Chemical Society, the world’s largest scientific society.

Tumors in mice treated with OGT2378 were one-tenth the size of those in untreated mice. The results suggest that a drug or other treatment can modify tumors in such a way that the body’s own defenses are able to attack the cancerous cells and eliminate growth, apparently without harmful side effects, Ladisch says.

"Chemotherapy and radiation are limited by the fact that the body can only withstand so much toxic exposure," Ladisch says. "As far as we know that’s not the case with these inhibitors of ganglioside production."

Although this approach doesn’t kill tumors, it makes them potentially easier to treat in other ways, Ladisch says. In some instances, the treatment might prevent cancer from recurring. In other cases, ganglioside inhibitors could be used in combination with chemotherapy to treat cancers that do not respond to chemotherapy alone. However, additional studies are needed to confirm that this approach is safe and effective in animals. It may still be several years before human clinical trials are conducted, Ladisch says.

In his studies, Ladisch found that 15 mice given OGT2378 as a dietary supplement beginning three days before being implanted with melanoma cells had significantly smaller tumors (61 millimeters in volume) a month after exposure compared to 15 untreated mice (538 millimeters in volume). Tumor growth also was significantly arrested in mice implanted with melanoma cells that were pretreated with OGT2378 as a way to reduce ganglioside production. In another study, mice treated with the compound seven days after being exposed to melanoma cells developed smaller tumors (101 millimeters in volume) over the next 31 days than untreated mice (620 millimeters in volume).

"The absence of these gangliosides allows the body to more easily curb tumor growth," Ladisch says. "While we don’t yet know the mechanism of the effect, what we do know is that we are changing the tumor’s own mechanics to stop its growth."

The American Chemical Society is a nonprofit organization, chartered by the U.S. Congress, with a multidisciplinary membership of more than 158,000 chemists and chemical engineers. It publishes numerous scientific journals and databases, convenes major research conferences and provides educational, science policy and career programs in chemistry. Its main offices are in Washington, D.C., and Columbus, Ohio.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Chemical Society. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

American Chemical Society. "Chemical Compound Inhibits Tumor Growth, Size In New Mouse Study." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 31 August 2005. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/08/050831075120.htm>.
American Chemical Society. (2005, August 31). Chemical Compound Inhibits Tumor Growth, Size In New Mouse Study. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 21, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/08/050831075120.htm
American Chemical Society. "Chemical Compound Inhibits Tumor Growth, Size In New Mouse Study." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/08/050831075120.htm (accessed April 21, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Monday, April 21, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Nine-Month-Old Baby Can't Open His Mouth

Nine-Month-Old Baby Can't Open His Mouth

Newsy (Apr. 19, 2014) Nine-month-old Wyatt Scott was born with a rare disorder called congenital trismus, which prevents him from opening his mouth. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
'Holy Grail' Of Weight Loss? New Find Could Be It

'Holy Grail' Of Weight Loss? New Find Could Be It

Newsy (Apr. 18, 2014) In a potential breakthrough for future obesity treatments, scientists have used MRI scans to pinpoint brown fat in a living adult for the first time. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Little Progress Made In Fighting Food Poisoning, CDC Says

Little Progress Made In Fighting Food Poisoning, CDC Says

Newsy (Apr. 18, 2014) A new report shows rates of two foodborne infections increased in the U.S. in recent years, while salmonella actually dropped 9 percent. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Scientists Create Stem Cells From Adult Skin Cells

Scientists Create Stem Cells From Adult Skin Cells

Newsy (Apr. 17, 2014) The breakthrough could mean a cure for some serious diseases and even the possibility of human cloning, but it's all still a way off. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins