Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

A Fatty Acid Found In Milk May Help Control Inflammatory Diseases

Date:
November 8, 2005
Source:
University of Wisconsin-Madison
Summary:
One of the isomers of conjugated linoleic acid, a group of fatty acids found in milk, is a natural regulator of the COX-2 protein, which plays a significant role in inflammatory disease such as arthritis and cancer, according to a study published by University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers.

One of the isomers of conjugated linoleic acid, a group of fatty acids found in milk, is a natural regulator of the COX-2 protein, which plays a significant role in inflammatory disease such as arthritis and cancer, according to a study published by University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers.

"It's clear from previous research that conjugated linoleic acid, or CLA, prevents inflammatory damage resulting from immune response," says Mark Cook, a professor of animal science in UW-Madison's College of Agricultural and Life Sciences. "We've identified the biochemical mechanism by which this occurs."

CLA, which is synthesized by microbial fermentation in the rumen of dairy cows, exists naturally in a number of structural forms. Cook's team determined that one of the variants inhibits the COX-2 protein by blocking a key cellular pathway. The COX-2 protein is known to play a significant role in many inflammatory diseases and is an important drug target for treating arthritis and cancer, Cook says.

While the amount of the anti-inflammatory isomer of CLA in milk is small relative to other fatty acids in milk, there may still be enough to elicit an effect if someone consumes dairy products every day, says Cook. He is planning a study, in collaboration with researchers in the dairy science and food science departments, to determine whether the amount of anti-inflammatory CLA in milk can be increased by changing dairy cow diets.

A poultry scientist, Cook's interest in CLA arose when he began to investigate what seemed at first to be a simple question: Why does a chick or any other animal raised in a germ-free environment grow faster than one raised in a conventional environment?

"In animal agriculture, you can see as much as a five to ten percent difference in weight at a given age in a growing animal because a secondary effect of immune response is that it suppresses growth," Cook says. The immune system protects the body by fighting disease, but the defense comes at a price, Cook says, including inflammation, muscle wasting and loss of appetite.

"Conventional wisdom dictates that you can increase growth by treating the animal with antibiotics to kill bacteria and avoid activating the immune defense system, but this raises long-term concerns about developing antibiotic resistance," he adds. "You can also suppress the animal's immune system, but that makes it much more susceptible to disease."

However, Cook is interested in another approach: Using CLA as a natural way to prevent "collateral damage" from the immune system's response to invading pathogens. "The ideal solution is to let the immune system fight bacteria, but at the same time to maintain the overall health of the system," he says.

Cook is one of many UW-Madison researchers who are interested in the health benefits of CLA. Others include Michael Pariza, director of the Food Research Institute and chair of the food microbiology and toxicology department; James Ntambi of the biochemistry department; and Dale Schoeller of the nutritional sciences department.

His collaborators on the recent study include Guangming Li, a postdoctoral fellow in animal sciences; David Barnes, a former assistant professor of animal sciences; Daniel Butz, a former research associate in nutritional sciences; and Dale Bjorling, a professor of surgical sciences.

###

The work was funded by a Thomsen Wisconsin Distinguished Graduate Fellowship, the College of Agricultural and Life Sciences, the University of Wisconsin-Madison, the Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation, and by BASF and Natural Lipids, Inc.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Wisconsin-Madison. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University of Wisconsin-Madison. "A Fatty Acid Found In Milk May Help Control Inflammatory Diseases." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 8 November 2005. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/11/051108083832.htm>.
University of Wisconsin-Madison. (2005, November 8). A Fatty Acid Found In Milk May Help Control Inflammatory Diseases. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 23, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/11/051108083832.htm
University of Wisconsin-Madison. "A Fatty Acid Found In Milk May Help Control Inflammatory Diseases." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/11/051108083832.htm (accessed July 23, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Wednesday, July 23, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Idaho Boy Helps Brother With Disabilities Complete Triathlon

Idaho Boy Helps Brother With Disabilities Complete Triathlon

Newsy (July 23, 2014) An 8-year-old boy helped his younger brother, who has a rare genetic condition that's confined him to a wheelchair, finish a triathlon. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Thousands Who Can't Afford Medical Care Flock to Free US Clinic

Thousands Who Can't Afford Medical Care Flock to Free US Clinic

AFP (July 23, 2014) America may be the world’s richest country, but in terms of healthcare, the World Health Organisation ranks it 37th. Thousands turned out for a free clinic run by "Remote Area Medical" with a visit from the Governor of Virginia. Duration: 2:40 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Stone Fruit Listeria Scare Causes Sweeping Recall

Stone Fruit Listeria Scare Causes Sweeping Recall

Newsy (July 22, 2014) The Wawona Packing Company has issued a voluntary recall on the stone fruit it distributes due to a possible Listeria outbreak. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Huge Schizophrenia Study Finds Dozens Of New Genetic Causes

Huge Schizophrenia Study Finds Dozens Of New Genetic Causes

Newsy (July 22, 2014) The 83 new genetic markers could open dozens of new avenues for schizophrenia treatment research. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins