Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

HOOF-Prints Help Find Where Outbreaks Begin

Date:
February 2, 2006
Source:
USDA/Agricultural Research Service
Summary:
Locating potential sources of brucellosis outbreaks is easier now, thanks to a new DNA fingerprinting technique developed by scientists with the Agricultural Research Service (ARS) and the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS).

A new DNA fingerprinting technique called HOOF-Prints can identify strains of Brucella bacteria. Brucellosis induces abortions in many animals including elk (shown here), sheep, goats, cattle, pigs and bison.
Credit: Photo by Keith Weller

Locating potential sources of brucellosis outbreaks is easier now, thanks to a new DNA fingerprinting technique developed by scientists with the Agricultural Research Service (ARS) and the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS).

Finding the source of these outbreaks helps with identification and isolation of infected animals, and with telling whether the outbreaks started in wildlife, according to microbiologists Betsy Bricker at ARS' National Animal Disease Center and Darla Ewalt of APHIS' National Veterinary Services Laboratories, both in Ames, Iowa.

The new technique -- called "HOOF-Prints," for Hypervariable Octameric Oligonucleotide Fingerprints -- allows scientists to identify strains of brucellosis through differences in their DNA sequences, and to separate these strains into subtypes.

Brucellosis is an extremely infectious disease caused by Brucella bacteria that induce abortions in many animals, including sheep, goats, cattle, pigs, elk and bison. Humans who come in contact with Brucella can get undulant fever, which is marked by chronic flulike symptoms.

Though almost eradicated from the United States, brucellosis can still prove costly to livestock producers through testing and losses. Outbreaks may cause states to lose brucellosis-free status, meaning their cattle must undergo extensive testing before they can be shipped away.

The new method uses polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technology, which copies large amounts of DNA molecules from small amounts of source DNA. According to Ewalt, the HOOF-Prints technique is intended to complement existing PCR and bacteriological tests used to identify Brucella species.

HOOF-Prints was first applied in the field in 2002 when it was used to trace a brucellosis outbreak in Fremont County, Idaho, cattle to local elk. It could eventually be applied toward generating an international database of Brucella fingerprints that would be used to control the disease, according to Bricker.

###

ARS and APHIS are part of the U.S. Department of Agriculture. ARS is USDA's chief scientific research agency, while APHIS protects and promotes the nation's agricultural health.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by USDA/Agricultural Research Service. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

USDA/Agricultural Research Service. "HOOF-Prints Help Find Where Outbreaks Begin." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 2 February 2006. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/02/060201232652.htm>.
USDA/Agricultural Research Service. (2006, February 2). HOOF-Prints Help Find Where Outbreaks Begin. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 29, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/02/060201232652.htm
USDA/Agricultural Research Service. "HOOF-Prints Help Find Where Outbreaks Begin." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/02/060201232652.htm (accessed July 29, 2014).

Share This




More Plants & Animals News

Tuesday, July 29, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Rodents Rampant in Gardens Around Louvre

Rodents Rampant in Gardens Around Louvre

AP (July 29, 2014) Food scraps and other items left on the grounds by picnickers brings unwelcome visitors to the grounds of the world famous and popular Louvre Museum in Paris. (July 29) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Jane Goodall Warns Great Apes Face Extinction

Jane Goodall Warns Great Apes Face Extinction

AFP (July 29, 2014) The world's great apes face extinction within decades, renowned chimpanzee expert Jane Goodall warned Tuesday in a call to arms to ensure man's closest relatives are not wiped out. Duration: 00:58 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
How Your Face Can Leave A Good Or Bad First Impression

How Your Face Can Leave A Good Or Bad First Impression

Newsy (July 29, 2014) Researchers have found certain facial features can make us seem more attractive or trustworthy. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Rat Infestation at Paris' Tuileries Garden

Rat Infestation at Paris' Tuileries Garden

AFP (July 29, 2014) An infestation of rats is causing concern among tourists at Paris' most famous park -- the Tuileries garden next to the Louvre Museum. Duration: 00:54 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins