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Northern Birds Are Fatter!

Date:
April 5, 2006
Source:
Society for Experimental Biology
Summary:
"The further birds migrate north for the summer, the faster they put on weight," says Dr Williams (Simon Fraser University, Canada) who has been tracking migrating birds for several years. "This research may have implications for the designation of protected areas which will ensure birds can complete their spring and autumn migrations." Williams will report his research on Western Sandpipers, which migrate from Mexico to Alaska.

"The further birds migrate north for the summer, the faster they put on weight", says Dr Williams (Simon Fraser University, Canada) who has been tracking migrating birds for several years. "This research may have implications for the designation of protected areas which will ensure birds can complete their spring and autumn migrations." Dr Williams will present his research on Tuesday 4th April at the Society for Experimental Biology's Annual Main Meeting in Canterbury [session A4].

"Our data can be used to assess habitat quality and the importance of specific sites for migratory birds, and this can contribute to decisions about whether migratory sites are protected and which sites are prioritised for protection", explains Williams.

Two techniques were used to study Western Sandpipers on their spring journey along the Pacific 'Flyway' from Mexico to Alaska: 80 birds were fitted with radio-telemetry tracking devices and a further 400 had blood samples taken to give measurements of fattening rate. Williams found that birds fatten more rapidly as they move further north -- as they get closer to the breeding grounds - and that the longer the birds spend hanging around at San Francisco Bay (one of the more southerly refuelling sites), the lower their fattening rates.

Such differences in fattening rates cannot simply be explained by differences in the availability of food. "Our current thinking is that the difference in fattening could be caused by differences in behaviour (birds simply feed more intensively in the north) or changes in physiology that the birds experience as they move further north", says Williams. "We know there are major differences in gut structure and digestive enzymes between non-migrating and migrating birds, so there might also be similar alterations in migrating bird's physiology further north, which allow more efficient digestion."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Society for Experimental Biology. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Society for Experimental Biology. "Northern Birds Are Fatter!." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 5 April 2006. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/04/060404085745.htm>.
Society for Experimental Biology. (2006, April 5). Northern Birds Are Fatter!. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 21, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/04/060404085745.htm
Society for Experimental Biology. "Northern Birds Are Fatter!." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/04/060404085745.htm (accessed October 21, 2014).

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