Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Cod In A Sweat: Some Like It Hot!

Date:
April 30, 2006
Source:
Society for Experimental Biology
Summary:
Wild cod are much less restricted by environmental temperature than previously thought. Researchers recently presented data that shows that while some fish prefer deeper cooler waters, others tagged at the same time prefer to swim in shallower habitats where summer temperatures are consistently above 17ΒΊC.

Arctic cod.
Credit: Photo credit: R. Hopcroft / Arctic Research Office, NOAA

Scientists at CEFAS (UK) have found that the migration pattern of wild cod is much less restricted by environmental temperature than laboratory studies suggest.

Related Articles


Previously, research in the lab indicated that the preferred temperature range of cod was between 11-15ΊC. However scientists following movements of wild cod equipped with electronic tags that record depth and temperature have found that whilst some fish prefer deeper cooler waters, others tagged at the same time prefer to swim in shallower habitats in the Southern North Sea where summer temperatures are consistently above 17ΊC. Dr Julian Metcalfe presented the latest results of the EU-funded CODYSSEY project at the Annual Meeting for the Society for Experimental Biology on April 3.

"We have found that cod in the northeast Atlantic repeatedly experience abrupt temperature changes of up to 8ΊC, suggesting that temperature may not be so crucial in constraining the movements and distribution of adult cod", explains Dr Metcalfe, "However this doesn't mean that climate change won't impact the numbers or distribution of cod populations since there may be other environmental factors such as prey distribution that could be affected by a rise in sea temperatures".

This work is from a large EU-funded project called CODYSSEY which aims to identify key environmental forcers of horizontal movements of cod. To date the programme has tagged and released over 2500 wild-caught cod across the North Sea, Barents Sea, Baltic Sea Faeroese waters and Icelandic waters. Seventeen percent of these tags have so far been returned. In the future the researchers plan to study other key species of interest to UK and EU fishermen.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Society for Experimental Biology. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Society for Experimental Biology. "Cod In A Sweat: Some Like It Hot!." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 30 April 2006. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/04/060430004644.htm>.
Society for Experimental Biology. (2006, April 30). Cod In A Sweat: Some Like It Hot!. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 28, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/04/060430004644.htm
Society for Experimental Biology. "Cod In A Sweat: Some Like It Hot!." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/04/060430004644.htm (accessed November 28, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Plants & Animals News

Friday, November 28, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Research on Bats Could Help Develop Drugs Against Ebola

Research on Bats Could Help Develop Drugs Against Ebola

AFP (Nov. 28, 2014) — In Africa's only biosafety level 4 laboratory, scientists have been carrying out experiments on bats to understand how virus like Ebola are being transmitted, and how some of them resist to it. Duration: 01:18 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
New Dinosaur Species Found in Museum Collection

New Dinosaur Species Found in Museum Collection

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Nov. 27, 2014) — A British palaeontologist has discovered a new species of dinosaur while studying fossils in a Canadian museum. Pentaceratops aquilonius was related to Triceratops and lived at the end of the Cretaceous Period, around 75 million years ago. Jim Drury has more. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Tryptophan Isn't Making You Sleepy On Thanksgiving

Tryptophan Isn't Making You Sleepy On Thanksgiving

Newsy (Nov. 27, 2014) — Tryptophan, a chemical found naturally in turkey meat, gets blamed for sleepiness after Thanksgiving meals. But science points to other culprits. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Classic Hollywood Memorabilia Goes Under the Hammer

Classic Hollywood Memorabilia Goes Under the Hammer

Reuters - Entertainment Video Online (Nov. 26, 2014) — The iconic piano from "Casablanca" and the Cowardly Lion suit from "The Wizard of Oz" fetch millions at auction. Sara Hemrajani reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories

 

Plants & Animals

Earth & Climate

Fossils & Ruins

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins