Science News
from research organizations

Antitumor Compound Blocks Heat Shock Protein

Date:
June 14, 2007
Source:
Journal of the National Cancer Institute
Summary:
Deguelin, a natural compound known to have antitumor properties, appears to disrupt the function of heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90), which cancer cells may need to grow. Heat shock proteins are expressed in response to higher temperatures and help prevent disruptions in protein folding. Hsp90, in particular, is often overexpressed in cancer cells and maintains stability and function of several oncoproteins, known as client proteins.
Share:
       
FULL STORY

Deguelin, a natural compound known to have antitumor properties, appears to disrupt the function of heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90), which cancer cells may need to grow.

Heat shock proteins are expressed in response to higher temperatures and help prevent disruptions in protein folding. Hsp90, in particular, is often overexpressed in cancer cells and maintains stability and function of several oncoproteins, known as client proteins.

Seung Hyun Oh, Ph.D., D.V.M., of the University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, and colleagues investigated whether deguelin inhibits the function of Hsp90. Mice with transplanted human non--small-cell lung cancer, head and neck cancer, stomach cancer, or prostate cancer were treated with deguelin or placebo twice a day for 15-28 days.

The researchers showed that deguelin directly binds to Hsp90 and inhibits its functional activity, which results in a reduction in the expression of its client proteins. Additionally, deguelin reduced tumor growth in mice without any detectable toxic side effects.

"Extensive and complete chronic toxicity testing in clinical trials is warranted before the further development of deguelin as an anticancer therapeutic agent," the authors write.


Story Source:

The above post is reprinted from materials provided by Journal of the National Cancer Institute. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Journal of the National Cancer Institute. "Antitumor Compound Blocks Heat Shock Protein." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 14 June 2007. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/06/070612183000.htm>.
Journal of the National Cancer Institute. (2007, June 14). Antitumor Compound Blocks Heat Shock Protein. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 7, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/06/070612183000.htm
Journal of the National Cancer Institute. "Antitumor Compound Blocks Heat Shock Protein." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/06/070612183000.htm (accessed July 7, 2015).

Share This Page: