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Female Iguanas Pay High Costs To Choose A Mate

Date:
June 27, 2007
Source:
Public Library of Science
Summary:
Picking a mate isn't easy -- if you are a female iguana. Scientists found that female Galápagos marine iguanas spend a lot of energy picking a mate from a wide range of suitors -- energy they could otherwise spend foraging, producing eggs or avoiding predators.

Mating pair of Galapagos marine iguanas.
Credit: Martin Wikelski

Picking a mate isn't easy--if you are a female iguana. In a study published in the June 27th issue of PLoS ONE, Maren Vitousek of Princeton University and colleagues found that female Galápagos marine iguanas spend a lot of energy picking a mate from a wide range of suitors -- energy they could otherwise spend foraging, producing eggs, or avoiding predators.

Scientists have generally assumed that being choosy about potential mates carries low costs for females. These costs were thought to be particularly small when male territories are clustered together in groups, known as 'leks', which make it possible for females to assess many candidates without traveling far.

Vitousek and colleagues measured how much energy female iguanas expend on mate choice in the wild using miniaturized data loggers developed by Anthony Woakes at the University of Birmingham. They found that females devote a surprising amount of effort to picking among males on a lek, even though they appear to gain only genetic material from their chosen mate. Visiting 'attractive' males (males that display more often) carries the highest costs. The longer female iguanas spend in the company of these appealing suitors the more weight they lose, and the smaller the eggs they subsequently produce.

Being choosy about potential mates can also decrease a female's chances for survival. During El Niño years marine iguanas have a hard time finding food, and those that start the season at a low body weight are less likely to live through it.

To make these costs worthwhile, the genetic or other payoffs females gain from their chosen mates must be substantial. Ongoing research is aimed at quantifying the magnitude of these benefits in order to gain a complete picture of the way mate choice works in this species.

These findings provide some of the first evidence that selecting a desirable partner is energetically costly for females. Understanding the costs of being choosy should help to illuminate the process of sexual selection, one of the primary forces driving evolution.

Citation: Vitousek MN, Mitchell MA, Woakes AJ, Niemack MD, Wikelski M (2007) High Costs of Female Choice in a Lekking Lizard. PLoS ONE 2(6): e567. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0000567 (http://www.plosone.org/doi/pone.0000567)


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The above story is based on materials provided by Public Library of Science. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Public Library of Science. "Female Iguanas Pay High Costs To Choose A Mate." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 27 June 2007. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/06/070627091634.htm>.
Public Library of Science. (2007, June 27). Female Iguanas Pay High Costs To Choose A Mate. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 21, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/06/070627091634.htm
Public Library of Science. "Female Iguanas Pay High Costs To Choose A Mate." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/06/070627091634.htm (accessed October 21, 2014).

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