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How Body Size Is Regulated

Date:
May 11, 2008
Source:
Helmholtz Zentrum München - German Research Center for Environmental Health
Summary:
Scientists are beginning to unravel the question why people distinctly vary in size. An international genome-wide study has discovered ten new genes that influence body height and thus provides new insights into biological pathways that are important for human growth.

Scientists are beginning to unravel the question why people distinctly vary in size. In cooperation with scientists of the HelmholtzZentrum München, an international genome-wide study has discovered ten new genes that influence body height and thus provides new insights into biological pathways that are important for human growth.

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This meta-analysis, published in Nature Genetics, is based on data from more than 26,000 study participants. It verifies two already known genes, but also discovered ten new genes. Altogether they explain a difference in body size of about 3.5 centimeters.

The analysis produced some biologically insightful findings. Several of the identified genes are targeted by the microRNA let-7, which affects the regulation of other genes. This connection was completely unknown until now. Several other SNPs may affect the structure of chromatin, the chromosome-surrounding proteins. Moreover, the results could have relevance for patients with inherited growth problems, or with problems in bone development, because some of the newly discovered genes have rare mutations, known to be associated with anomalous skeletal growth.

Further functional studies are necessary to completely elucidate the biological mechanisms behind this growing list of genes related to height.

As German contribution to the meta-analysis, data from about 5,600 participants of the KORA study were analyzed by the HelmholtzZentrum scientists, Dr. Christian Gieger, Dr. Susana Eyheramendy, PD Dr. Thomas Illig, Dr. Iris M. Heid and Prof. Dr. Dr. H.-Erich Wichmann. In order to genotype 500,000 of the most frequent variants in the human genome, DNA chips were analyzed at the Institute for Human Genetics and the Institute of Epidemiology of the HelmholtzZentrum München under the direction of Prof. Dr. Thomas Meitinger.

The coordinator of the study was Dr. Guillaume Lettre; Prof. Joel Hirschhorn acted as the principal investigator. Both scientists work at the Broad Institute of the MIT and the Harvard University, Cambridge. All investigators are part of the recently formed international consortium to study height and obesity-related traits (GIANT, Genetic Investigation of ANthropometric Traits).

Along with the results of a British study that was published simultaneously in Nature Genetics, the total number of known "height genes" now amounts to 26.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Helmholtz Zentrum München - German Research Center for Environmental Health. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal References:

  1. Guillaume Lettre, Anne U Jackson, Christian Gieger, Fredrick R Schumacher, Sonja I Berndt, Serena Sanna, Susana Eyheramendy, Benjamin F Voight, Johannah L Butler, Candace Guiducci, Thomas Illig, Rachel Hackett, Iris M Heid, Kevin B Jacobs, Valeriya Lyssenko, Manuela Uda, Michael Boehnke, Stephen J Chanock, Leif C Groop, Frank B Hu, Bo Isomaa, Peter Kraft, Leena Peltonen, Veikko Salomaa, David Schlessinger, David J Hunter, Richard B Hayes, Gonçalo R Abecasis, H-Erich Wichmann, Karen L Mohlke, Joel N Hirschhorn. Identification of ten loci associated with height highlights new biological pathways in human growth. Nature Genetics, 2008; 40 (5): 584 DOI: 10.1038/ng.125
  2. Michael N Weedon, Hana Lango, Cecilia M Lindgren, Chris Wallace, David M Evans, Massimo Mangino, Rachel M Freathy, John R B Perry, Suzanne Stevens, Alistair S Hall, Nilesh J Samani, Beverly Shields, Inga Prokopenko, Martin Farrall, Anna Dominiczak, Toby Johnson, Sven Bergmann, Jacques S Beckmann, Peter Vollenweider, Dawn M Waterworth, Vincent Mooser, Colin N A Palmer, Andrew D Morris, Willem H Ouwehand, Jing Hua Zhao, Shengxu Li, Ruth J F Loos, Inês Barroso, Panagiotis Deloukas, Manjinder S Sandhu, Eleanor Wheeler, Nicole Soranzo, Michael Inouye, Nicholas J Wareham, Mark Caulfield, Patricia B Munroe, Andrew T Hattersley, Mark I McCarthy, Timothy M Frayling. Genome-wide association analysis identifies 20 loci that influence adult height. Nature Genetics, 2008; 40 (5): 575 DOI: 10.1038/ng.121

Cite This Page:

Helmholtz Zentrum München - German Research Center for Environmental Health. "How Body Size Is Regulated." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 11 May 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/05/080509162338.htm>.
Helmholtz Zentrum München - German Research Center for Environmental Health. (2008, May 11). How Body Size Is Regulated. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 31, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/05/080509162338.htm
Helmholtz Zentrum München - German Research Center for Environmental Health. "How Body Size Is Regulated." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/05/080509162338.htm (accessed October 31, 2014).

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