Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Beneficial Bacteria Help Control Produce Pathogen

Date:
June 12, 2008
Source:
USDA/Agricultural Research Service
Summary:
A new food safety treatment could increase the effectiveness of conventional produce sanitization methods. Microbiologists developed and tested the method, which pits beneficial bacteria against potentially harmful ones. The beneficial bacteria inhibit the growth of pathogens that survive initial physical or chemical attempts to remove them from fresh produce. Produce pathogens are a prominent source of food-borne illness in the United States.

ARS researchers have identified three beneficial bacteria that can inhibit the growth of pathogens on fresh fruits and vegetables. The bacteria were tested by dipping peppers in solutions with the beneficial bacteria.
Credit: Photo courtesy of USDA

A new food safety treatment developed by the Agricultural Research Service (ARS) could increase the effectiveness of conventional produce sanitization methods.

Related Articles


ARS microbiologist Ching-Hsing Liao developed and tested the method, which pits beneficial bacteria against potentially harmful ones. The beneficial bacteria inhibit the growth of pathogens that survive initial physical or chemical attempts to remove them from fresh produce. Produce pathogens are a prominent source of food-borne illness in the United States.

At the ARS Eastern Regional Research Center (ERRC) in Wyndmoor, Pa., Liao identified three beneficial bacterial antagonists for use in food safety intervention. He dipped bell peppers in solutions of water containing the beneficial antagonists and examined the effect on surface pathogens such as Salmonella and E. coli O157:H7.

One bacterium, known as Pseudomonas fluorescens 2-79, was particularly effective. Dipping peppers in a Pf 2-79 solution for about two minutes halted pathogen multiplication almost entirely.

On untreated peppers, pathogen populations multiplied about 100,000 times when stored at 68 degrees Fahrenheit for two days. But treating peppers with Pf 2-79 suppressed pathogen growth. This treatment could potentially prevent pathogens from proliferating to numbers capable of causing human illness.

The dip also stopped the growth of two common spoilage bacteria and reduced the development of soft rot.

Pf 2-79 is easy to grow and can colonize several types of produce. Because it can grow at refrigeration temperatures, it could be an effective control agent for cold-tolerant pathogens such as Listeria monocytogenes and Yersinia enterocolitica.

Liao and his colleagues plan to validate the research on a larger scale. Their research will also aim to identify additional bacterial strains that could be used with Pf 2-79 to further improve produce safety and quality.

Consumers can help remove pathogens from produce at home by taking simple food safety precautions, such as peeling, washing or cooking the produce.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by USDA/Agricultural Research Service. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

USDA/Agricultural Research Service. "Beneficial Bacteria Help Control Produce Pathogen." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 12 June 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/06/080606133836.htm>.
USDA/Agricultural Research Service. (2008, June 12). Beneficial Bacteria Help Control Produce Pathogen. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 29, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/06/080606133836.htm
USDA/Agricultural Research Service. "Beneficial Bacteria Help Control Produce Pathogen." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/06/080606133836.htm (accessed November 29, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Plants & Animals News

Saturday, November 29, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Research on Bats Could Help Develop Drugs Against Ebola

Research on Bats Could Help Develop Drugs Against Ebola

AFP (Nov. 28, 2014) In Africa's only biosafety level 4 laboratory, scientists have been carrying out experiments on bats to understand how virus like Ebola are being transmitted, and how some of them resist to it. Duration: 01:18 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
New Dinosaur Species Found in Museum Collection

New Dinosaur Species Found in Museum Collection

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Nov. 27, 2014) A British palaeontologist has discovered a new species of dinosaur while studying fossils in a Canadian museum. Pentaceratops aquilonius was related to Triceratops and lived at the end of the Cretaceous Period, around 75 million years ago. Jim Drury has more. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Tryptophan Isn't Making You Sleepy On Thanksgiving

Tryptophan Isn't Making You Sleepy On Thanksgiving

Newsy (Nov. 27, 2014) Tryptophan, a chemical found naturally in turkey meat, gets blamed for sleepiness after Thanksgiving meals. But science points to other culprits. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Classic Hollywood Memorabilia Goes Under the Hammer

Classic Hollywood Memorabilia Goes Under the Hammer

Reuters - Entertainment Video Online (Nov. 26, 2014) The iconic piano from "Casablanca" and the Cowardly Lion suit from "The Wizard of Oz" fetch millions at auction. Sara Hemrajani reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Plants & Animals

Earth & Climate

Fossils & Ruins

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins