Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

New Silverleaf Whitefly Resistant To Many Pesticides

Date:
July 2, 2008
Source:
USDA/Agricultural Research Service
Summary:
A devastating tropical and subtropical pest that's already considered one of the world's top invasive species just got a bit more troublesome. The silverleaf whitefly (Bemisia tabaci) threatens a wide range of crops. Of the more than 20 known biotypes of this species, two of the most devastating are the B and Q biotypes. The Q biotype, newly arrived in the U.S., is less susceptible to many pesticide types.

A new silverleaf whitefly, Q biotype, a cousin to the more common B biotype pictured here, has been identified in 25 states by ARS scientists. Q biotype is a major concern because it is less susceptible to many pesticides.
Credit: Photo by Scott Bauer

A devastating tropical and subtropical pest that's already considered one of the world's top invasive species just got a bit more troublesome.

The silverleaf whitefly (Bemisia tabaci) threatens a wide range of crops. Of the more than 20 known biotypes of this species, two of the most devastating are the B and Q biotypes. While the B type has been in the United States since its discovery in 1985, now type Q has been identified in 25 states.

For years, Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists in the Subtropical Insects Research Unit at Ft. Pierce, Fla.--led by entomologist Cindy McKenzie and molecular biologists Bob Shatters and Laura Boykin--have worked with collaborators on extensive studies of the B and Q biotypes.

Both types of whiteflies can reduce the yield of a broad range of agricultural, fiber, vegetable and ornamental crops. The aggressive B biotype arrived here from its native Middle East and Asia Minor range. It threatened agricultural production throughout the southern United States until new integrated pest management strategies brought it into check. Now, the Q type brings new challenges.

The newly arrived biotype was first detected in the United States in December 2004 on poinsettias from an Arizona retail outlet. Compared to the B biotype, Q is less susceptible to many pesticide types, which means there are fewer chemical options for its control. There is also concern that resistance to insecticidal controls may occur more rapidly in the Q biotype.

With the help of the ARS scientists, a Q biotype task force was set up to develop new control recommendations. Nationwide monitoring suggests that these improved recommendations are helping to slow or prevent the movement of the Q biotype into commercial vegetable fields. For now, rapid implementation of the new control strategies has greatly reduced control problems.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by USDA/Agricultural Research Service. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

USDA/Agricultural Research Service. "New Silverleaf Whitefly Resistant To Many Pesticides." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 2 July 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/06/080629074432.htm>.
USDA/Agricultural Research Service. (2008, July 2). New Silverleaf Whitefly Resistant To Many Pesticides. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 22, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/06/080629074432.htm
USDA/Agricultural Research Service. "New Silverleaf Whitefly Resistant To Many Pesticides." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/06/080629074432.htm (accessed July 22, 2014).

Share This




More Plants & Animals News

Tuesday, July 22, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Michigan Plant's Goal: Flower and Die

Michigan Plant's Goal: Flower and Die

AP (July 22, 2014) — An 80-year-old agave plant, which is blooming for the first and only time at a University of Michigan conservatory, will die when it's done (July 22) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
San Diego Zoo Welcomes New, Rare Rhino Calf

San Diego Zoo Welcomes New, Rare Rhino Calf

Reuters - US Online Video (July 21, 2014) — An endangered black rhino baby is the newest resident at the San Diego Zoo. Sasha Salama reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Shark Sightings a Big Catch for Cape Tourism

Shark Sightings a Big Catch for Cape Tourism

AP (July 21, 2014) — A rise in shark sightings along the shores of Chatham, Massachusetts is driving a surge of eager vacationers to the beach town looking to catch a glimpse of a great white. (July 21) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
$23.6 Billion Awarded To Widow In Smoking Lawsuit

$23.6 Billion Awarded To Widow In Smoking Lawsuit

Newsy (July 20, 2014) — Cynthia Robinson claims R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Company hid the health and addiction risks of its products, leading to the death of her husband in 1996. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins