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Small Fly Has Receptor For Painful Heat

Date:
October 3, 2008
Source:
National Institute for Physiological Sciences
Summary:
Scientists have found that a small fly, drosophila, has a receptor for noxious heat.
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Japanese research group led by Prof Makoto Tominaga and Dr Takaaki Sokabe, National Institute for Physiological Sciences (NIPS), Japan, found that a small fly, drosophila, has a receptor for noxious heat.

It has been unknown how flies detect a noxious heat to avoid it.

The research group investigated the function of "Painless" protein, which had been known to be important for heat avoidance behavior in flies. This protein had been predicted as one type of ionic TRP (transient receptor potential) channels. They found that the channel can sense noxious heat directly.

The channel activity was modulated by intracellular calcium to maintain optimal sensitivity. Camphor, a moth repellent, did block the activity of this channel.

Dr. Sokabe said, "this is the first report to show that flies can sense hazardous heat by a specific sensor, namely 'Painless'. This finding may help designing new anti-fly substance."

 The research group reports their finding in Journal of Neuroscience published on Oct 1, 2008.


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The above post is reprinted from materials provided by National Institute for Physiological Sciences. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


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National Institute for Physiological Sciences. "Small Fly Has Receptor For Painful Heat." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 3 October 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/09/080930173939.htm>.
National Institute for Physiological Sciences. (2008, October 3). Small Fly Has Receptor For Painful Heat. ScienceDaily. Retrieved June 30, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/09/080930173939.htm
National Institute for Physiological Sciences. "Small Fly Has Receptor For Painful Heat." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/09/080930173939.htm (accessed June 30, 2015).

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