Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Growing Peppers: Does Hotter Mean Healthier?

Date:
February 18, 2009
Source:
American Society for Horticultural Science
Summary:
Phytophthora blight, caused by Phytophthora capsici, is a major plant disease that affects many crop species worldwide, including chile peppers in New Mexico. Farmers' observations suggested that Phytophthora capsici caused less damage in pepper crops of the hot pepper varieties than low-heat pepper varieties.

Here, the relationship between chile peppers' heat level and plant disease resistance is studied.
Credit: Soumaila Sanogo

Phytophthora blight, caused by Phytophthora capsici, is a major plant disease that affects many crop species worldwide, including chile peppers in New Mexico. Farmers' observations suggested that Phytophthora capsici caused less damage in pepper crops of the hot pepper varieties than low-heat pepper varieties.

Related Articles


A study published in the October 2008 issue of HortScience by the research team of Mohammed B. Tahboub (postdoctoral researcher), Soumaila Sanogo (plant pathologist and team leader), Paul W. Bosland (chile pepper breeder), and Leigh Murray (statistician) set out to determine whether or not the severity of Phytophthora blight would be greater in low-heat than in hot chile peppers.

The most effective means for controlling Phytophthora blight are chile pepper cultivars that are genetically resistant to the disease. Some resistant lines have been identified, but currently there are no cultivars that are resistant to the blight in all environments.

Chile pepper fruit become infected during prolonged periods of heavy rain and high humidity in flooded and poorly drained fields. Prior to this study, there had been no systematic assessment of the relationship of chile pepper heat level to chile pepper response to Phytophthora capsici. If such a connection could be found, information might have been revealed that would assist breeding programs intended for developing disease-resistant cultivars of pepper.

Based on documented field observations in New Mexico, Arizona, and South Carolina, the researchers hypothesized that peppers that produce high-heat fruits would be more resistant to Phytophthora blight than low-heat varieties. The study was conducted by observing infection on both the root and fruit of different varieties of peppers included.

The results of the study concluded, however, that there was no relationship between the heat level of the pepper and the plant's resistance to Phytophthora blight. For example, while the disease was slowest to develop on the roots of one variety of jalapeño, it was quickest to develop on the fruit of the same plant.

Conversely, the disease was faster to develop on roots and slower on fruit of all other cultivars. As the root of the plant contains no heat-inducing agents but the fruit does, the slow development on the root and rapid development on the fruit of the jalapeño indicates that heat level is not a factor.

The results of this study indicate that factors other than heat level may be involved in fruit response to Phytophthora capsici. Genetic differences and cuticle thickness of the plants and fruits are among other issues that could be relevant, but further study is warranted.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Society for Horticultural Science. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Mohammed B. Tahboub et al. Heat Level in Chile Pepper in Relation to Root and Fruit Infection by Phytophthora. HortScience, 43: 1634-1933 (2008) [link]

Cite This Page:

American Society for Horticultural Science. "Growing Peppers: Does Hotter Mean Healthier?." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 18 February 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/02/090203142519.htm>.
American Society for Horticultural Science. (2009, February 18). Growing Peppers: Does Hotter Mean Healthier?. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 20, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/02/090203142519.htm
American Society for Horticultural Science. "Growing Peppers: Does Hotter Mean Healthier?." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/02/090203142519.htm (accessed November 20, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Plants & Animals News

Thursday, November 20, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Your Complicated Job Might Keep Your Brain Young

Your Complicated Job Might Keep Your Brain Young

Newsy (Nov. 20, 2014) — Researchers at the University of Edinburgh found the more complex your job is, the sharper your cognitive skills will likely be as you age. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Mysterious Glow Worms Found in the Amazon

Mysterious Glow Worms Found in the Amazon

Buzz60 (Nov. 20, 2014) — Wildlife photographer Jeff Cremer teamed up with entomologist Aaron Pomerantz and others to investigate a predatory glow worm found in the Amazon. Patrick Jones (@Patrick_E_Jones) explains. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com
Raw: Huge Snow Covers Buffalo Streets

Raw: Huge Snow Covers Buffalo Streets

AP (Nov. 20, 2014) — A new blast of lake-effect snow roared through western New York with thunder and lightning on Thursday, raising to nearly 6 feet the three-day total in parts of the Buffalo area. (Nov. 20) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Report Warns of Global Chocolate Shortage

Report Warns of Global Chocolate Shortage

Buzz60 (Nov. 20, 2014) — A new report warns the world could face a 2.2-billion pound chocolate shortage within the next five years. Mike Janela (@mikejanela) explains. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories

 

Plants & Animals

Earth & Climate

Fossils & Ruins

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins