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Raising The Alarm About Chimpanzee Massacre In The Democratic Republic Of Congo

Date:
March 26, 2009
Source:
Universiteit van Amsterdam (UVA)
Summary:
Poachers in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) threaten the existence of the largest remaining continuous population of chimpanzees in the world. This conclusion is based on observations made during a 2007-2008 survey of towns, villages and forests in the Buta-Aketi region of the country.

Poachers in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) threaten the existence of the largest remaining continuous population of chimpanzees in the world. This conclusion is drawn by Cleve Hicks, based on observations made during his 2007-2008 survey of towns, villages and forests in the Buta-Aketi region of the country.
Credit: Cleve Hicks

Poachers in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) threaten the existence of the largest remaining continuous population of chimpanzees in the world. This conclusion is drawn by Cleve Hicks, based on observations made during his 2007-2008 survey of towns, villages and forests in the Buta-Aketi region of the country.

Hicks, a researcher at the University of Amsterdam (UvA), describes the plight of the apes and other forest creatures in a new e-book to be released this week. Together with colleagues, Hicks was able to take in five orphaned chimpanzees who will soon be sent to a sanctuary in eastern Congo.

During his previous one and a half year study near the town of Bili, the DRC between 2004-2007, Cleve Hicks, who works for the Institute for Biodiversity and Ecosystem Dynamics (IBED) of the University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands, did not observe a single chimpanzee orphan or carcass in the area, despite the fact that chimpanzees were numerous in the forests there. When Bili was overrun with gold miners in june 2007, Hicks conducted a 13 month survey of large mammals about 200 km of Bili, in the Buta Aketi region.

He found that the chimpazees in this region had the same culture (ground-nesting, snail-smashing, ant-dipping) as the bili apes, and, as at Bili, were found even within 15 km of all major population centers surveyed. He concludes that the chimpanzees of northern DRC have not yet become fragmented into scattered populations by human activities.

However, during this most recent study period, Hicks and his staffwitnessed 34 chimpanzee orphans and 31 carcasses for sale in the Buta-Aketi-Bambesa area. In addition, the team documented 10 okapi skins, 9 leopard skins, the parts of 13 elephants and hundreds of monkey orphans and carcasses. Locals have told Hicks that up to a few years ago there was very little poaching (except for elephants) in the area, and that it is the mining of diamonds and gold that has lead to the current slaughter of wildlife. Sadly, there is evidence that the bushmeat trade is spreading rapidly into the Bili and Rubi-Tele protected areas, both of which have been recently invaded by illegal miners. Since Hicks left in november 2008, his colleagues Laura Darby and Adam Singh have observed another seven chimpanzee orphans and 3 carcasses.

Together with Darby and Singh, Hicks was able to take in five chimpanzee bushmeat orphans who will soon find a home in a licensed sanctuary in the DRC. In addition, the Wasmoeth Wildlife foundation is now building a chimpanzee sanctuary called Boyoma in Kisangani. However, according to Hicks this does not change the fact that if something is not done now, we willsoon lose one of the largest remaining tracts of untouched wilderness on the planet,and with it will gothe apes, elephants, okapis and traditional human societies that depend upon its existence.

Please see Hicks' new ebook describing the crisis, which can be viewed at http://www.wasmoethwildlife.org.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Universiteit van Amsterdam (UVA). Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Universiteit van Amsterdam (UVA). "Raising The Alarm About Chimpanzee Massacre In The Democratic Republic Of Congo." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 26 March 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/03/090324111818.htm>.
Universiteit van Amsterdam (UVA). (2009, March 26). Raising The Alarm About Chimpanzee Massacre In The Democratic Republic Of Congo. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 19, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/03/090324111818.htm
Universiteit van Amsterdam (UVA). "Raising The Alarm About Chimpanzee Massacre In The Democratic Republic Of Congo." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/03/090324111818.htm (accessed September 19, 2014).

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