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Mystery E. Coli Genes Essential For Survival Of Many Species

Date:
July 13, 2009
Source:
Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC)
Summary:
Scientists have shown that E. coli - one of the best known and extensively studied organisms in the world - remains an enigma that may hold the key to human diseases, such as cancer.Scientists have examined the genome sequence of this workhorse of the laboratory and spotted three previously unknown genes that, it turns out, are essential for the survival of E. coli and one out of the three could also be implicated in cancer or developmental abnormalities in humans.

Scientists have shown that E. coli - one of the best known and extensively studied organisms in the world - remains an enigma that may hold the key to human diseases, such as cancer.

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The team, funded by the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) and based at the University of Dundee has examined the genome sequence of this workhorse of the laboratory and spotted three previously unknown genes that, it turns out, are essential for the survival of E. coli and one out of the three could also be implicated in cancer or developmental abnormalities in humans. These mystery genes are also found in numerous other creatures, suggesting a vital role for them across many species.

The effort over recent years to sequence genomes of various important species has uncovered many previously unknown genes. This has given scientists the opportunity to choose to study these genes now, rather than waiting for them to make themselves known serendipitously e.g. when they are implicated in disease. Professor Tracy Palmer and her colleagues have taken three genes identified through sequencing of the E. coli genome and studied them to discover their significance.

Professor Palmer said: "Scientists have been studying E. coli genes for many, many years and we thought we knew pretty much all there was to know - we certainly didn't expect to find any more genes that are essential for survival!

"Finding out that these genes are essential in E. coli and also appear in the genomes of other species tells us that they are very important indeed. In the case of one of the genes it is also found in the human genome, which makes it especially interesting. The mystery remains as to what they actually do, but whatever it is, it must be really crucial.

"Because we now know that one of these genes is found in humans as well, we might be looking at something that is really important in our development or that might cause disease."

Early indications from Professor Palmer's work suggest that the genes, named yjeE, yeaZ and ygjD could be involved in cell division. ygjD is present in the human genome and also appears to be the key player of the three genes found in E. coli.

Professor Palmer continued: "We've done experiments that show these genes affect how E. coli cells respond to different messages that tell them when to divide. If they do the same thing in humans then any problems with these genes could easily lead to developmental abnormalities or cancer."

The research will be published in the 1 August edition of the Journal of Bacteriology.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC). Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC). "Mystery E. Coli Genes Essential For Survival Of Many Species." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 13 July 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/07/090713085252.htm>.
Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC). (2009, July 13). Mystery E. Coli Genes Essential For Survival Of Many Species. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 1, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/07/090713085252.htm
Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC). "Mystery E. Coli Genes Essential For Survival Of Many Species." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/07/090713085252.htm (accessed November 1, 2014).

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