Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Yeast Cancer Model For Mapping Cancer Genes

Date:
August 3, 2009
Source:
Public Library of Science
Summary:
Researchers have devised a scheme for identifying genes in yeast that could lead to the identification of new cancer genes in humans.

Researchers have devised a scheme for identifying genes in yeast that could lead to the identification of new cancer genes in humans.

Related Articles


Cancers arise from the accumulation of mutations or genetic alterations resulting in the uncontrolled proliferation of cells. However, the number of mutations accumulated during the evolution of cancerous cells is large, making it difficult to identify which of the mutations are responsible for the cancer phenotypes. Identifying new genes that sustain cancerous growth is a major challenge in the campaign against cancers.

Aneuploidy, an abnormality in chromosome number and structure, is a hallmark of many cancer cells. One idea is that aneuploidy may cause cancer by changing the dosage or expression of oncogenes (cancer-causing genes). After decades of research, only a handful of human oncogenes have been identified, accounting for a tiny fraction of all cancers So methods of identifying new oncogenes through their association with aneuploidy has become an accepted strategy in the cancer field.

The Mcm4Chaos3 mutation causes a defect in an enzyme that unwinds DNA during DNA replication and predisposes mice to mammary tumors. In this study, a team led by Bik Tye from Cornell University introduced the equivalent mutation in yeast. Yeast with this mutation generate chromosomal abnormalities and yield faster growing progeny, a situation reminiscent of what happens in tumors. Using the yeast genetics tools the researchers could show that improved growth is not linked to aneuploidy, but to point mutations in just a few genetic loci.

Pathways and genes that regulate proliferation rates are likely to be conserved in all eukaryotes. So, by identifying mutations that give cells a growth advantage in yeast, the simplest of eukaryotes, will help guide the search of cancer genes in humans.

This work was supported by National Institutes of Health grant GM072557 awarded to BKT. The funder had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Public Library of Science. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Li et al. Aneuploidy and Improved Growth Are Coincident but Not Causal in a Yeast Cancer Model. PLoS Biology, 2009; 7 (7): e1000161 DOI: 10.1371/journal.pbio.1000161

Cite This Page:

Public Library of Science. "Yeast Cancer Model For Mapping Cancer Genes." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 3 August 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/07/090727203626.htm>.
Public Library of Science. (2009, August 3). Yeast Cancer Model For Mapping Cancer Genes. ScienceDaily. Retrieved March 28, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/07/090727203626.htm
Public Library of Science. "Yeast Cancer Model For Mapping Cancer Genes." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/07/090727203626.htm (accessed March 28, 2015).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Saturday, March 28, 2015

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

These Popular Antibiotics Can Cause Permanent Nerve Damage

These Popular Antibiotics Can Cause Permanent Nerve Damage

Newsy (Mar. 27, 2015) — A popular class of antibiotic can leave patients in severe pain and even result in permanent nerve damage. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
House Ready to Pass Medicare Doc Bill

House Ready to Pass Medicare Doc Bill

AP (Mar. 26, 2015) — In rare bipartisan harmony, congressional leaders pushed a $214 billion bill permanently blocking physician Medicare cuts toward House passage Thursday, moving lawmakers closer to resolving a problem that has plagued them for years. (March 26) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
What's Different About This Latest Ebola Vaccine

What's Different About This Latest Ebola Vaccine

Newsy (Mar. 26, 2015) — A whole virus Ebola vaccine has been shown to protect monkeys exposed to the virus. Here&apos;s what&apos;s different about this vaccine. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
HIV Outbreak Prompts Public Health Emergency In Indiana

HIV Outbreak Prompts Public Health Emergency In Indiana

Newsy (Mar. 26, 2015) — Indiana Gov. Mike Pence says he will bring additional state resources to help stop the epidemic. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories

 

Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins