Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Cape Tulips: Pretty But Pests In Pastures

Date:
September 10, 2009
Source:
CSIRO Australia
Summary:
Agricultural researchers are trying to outwit one of southern Australia's worst agricultural weeds.

Cape tulips, imported as attractive garden plants, are now pasture pests in Western Australia, South Australia, Victoria and New South Wales.
Credit: Paul Yeoh, CSIRO Entomology

CSIRO and the Department of Agriculture and Food Western Australia (DAFWA) are collaborating to try to outwit one of southern Australia’s worst agricultural weeds.

“We are initiating a one-year study to see if it would be feasible to control one and two-leaf Cape tulips (Moraea flaccida and M. miniata) using the rust fungus Puccinia moraeae as a biological control agent,” CSIRO Entomology’s Dr John Scott said.

“Dr Louise Morin, our experienced plant pathologist, will be testing various rust isolates to see how pathogenic they are on Cape tulips occurring in Australia as well as testing them on a few key closely-related, non-target plant species.

“We are initiating a one-year study to see if it would be feasible to control one and two-leaf Cape tulips (Moraea flaccida and M. miniata) using the rust fungus Puccinia moraeae as a biological control agent,” CSIRO Entomology’s Dr John Scott said.

“The tests will be conducted in the AQIS-accredited CSIRO Black Mountain Containment Facility in Canberra.”

Dr Scott said Cape tulips appear to be suitable targets for biological control because there are only a few close relatives among Australian native species and no related crops.

The logical place to look for possible biological control agents for Cape tulips was their home range, South Africa. Earlier CSIRO surveys there identified three potential biological control agents, of which the rust appears the most promising.

This initial study, funded by DAFWA, will yield information on the aggressiveness of the rust on Cape tulips and assist in determining its biological control potential.

“It will also provide preliminary information on the susceptibility of key non-target plant species to the rust. This is an important first step in deciding if the rust should undergo future comprehensive host-specificity testing,” Dr Scott said. Cape tulips were introduced to Australia from South Africa in the mid-19th Century as garden plants. Since then, they have become major pasture weeds in Western Australia, South Australia, Victoria and New South Wales. They are unpalatable and poisonous to livestock.

Cape tulips are also invading natural ecosystems and have the potential to be serious environmental weeds.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by CSIRO Australia. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

CSIRO Australia. "Cape Tulips: Pretty But Pests In Pastures." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 10 September 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/08/090817143640.htm>.
CSIRO Australia. (2009, September 10). Cape Tulips: Pretty But Pests In Pastures. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 17, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/08/090817143640.htm
CSIRO Australia. "Cape Tulips: Pretty But Pests In Pastures." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/08/090817143640.htm (accessed September 17, 2014).

Share This



More Plants & Animals News

Wednesday, September 17, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Some Tobacco Farmers Thrive Amid Challenges

Some Tobacco Farmers Thrive Amid Challenges

AP (Sep. 16, 2014) The South's tobacco country is surviving, and even thriving in some cases, as demand overseas keeps growers in the fields of one of America's oldest cash crops. (Sept. 16) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Scientists Given Rare Glimpse of 350-Kilo Colossal Squid

Scientists Given Rare Glimpse of 350-Kilo Colossal Squid

AFP (Sep. 16, 2014) Scientists say a female colossal squid weighing an estimated 350 kilograms (770 lbs) and thought to be only the second intact specimen ever found was carrying eggs when discovered in the Antarctic. Duration: 00:47 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Raw: Scientists Examine Colossal Squid

Raw: Scientists Examine Colossal Squid

AP (Sep. 16, 2014) Squid experts in New Zealand thawed and examined an unusual catch on Tuesday: a colossal squid. It was captured in Antarctica's remote Ross Sea in December last year and has been frozen for eight months. (Sept. 16) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ivorians Abandon Monkey Pets in Fear Over Ebola Virus

Ivorians Abandon Monkey Pets in Fear Over Ebola Virus

AFP (Sep. 16, 2014) Since the arrival of Ebola in Ivory Coast, Ivorians have been abandoning their pets, particularly monkeys, in the fear that they may transmit the virus. Duration: 00:47 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

    Environment News

      Technology News



      Save/Print:
      Share:

      Free Subscriptions


      Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

      Get Social & Mobile


      Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

      Have Feedback?


      Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
      Mobile: iPhone Android Web
      Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
      Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
      Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins