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School classroom air may be more polluted with ultrafine particles than outdoor air

Date:
December 23, 2009
Source:
American Chemical Society
Summary:
The air in some school classrooms may contain higher levels of extremely small particles of pollutants -- easily inhaled deep into the lungs -- than polluted outdoor air, scientists say.

The air in some school classrooms may contain higher levels of extremely small particles of pollutants -- easily inhaled deep into the lungs -- than polluted outdoor air, scientists say.
Credit: iStockphoto/Kristian Sekulic

The air in some school classrooms may contain higher levels of extremely small particles of pollutants -- easily inhaled deep into the lungs -- than polluted outdoor air, scientists in Australia and Germany are reporting in an article in Environmental Science & Technology.

Lidia Morawska and colleagues note increasing concern in recent years over the health effects of airborne ultrafine particles. Evidence suggests that they can be toxic when inhaled into the lungs. Much of the scientific research, however, has focused on outdoor sources of these invisible particles, particularly vehicle emissions. Little research has been done, however, on indoor sources, and even less on ultrafine particles in school classrooms.

In an effort to fill those gaps in knowledge, the scientists studied levels of ultrafine particles in 3 elementary school classrooms in Brisbane, Australia. They found that on numerous occasions ultrafine particle levels in the classrooms were significantly higher than outdoors. The highest levels occurred during art activities such as gluing, painting and drawing when indoor levels were several times higher than outdoor levels. There also were significant increases in ultrafine particle levels when detergents were used for cleaning.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Chemical Society. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Morawska et al. Ultrafine Particles in Indoor Air of a School: Possible Role of Secondary Organic Aerosols. Environmental Science & Technology, 2009; 43 (24): 9103 DOI: 10.1021/es902471a

Cite This Page:

American Chemical Society. "School classroom air may be more polluted with ultrafine particles than outdoor air." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 23 December 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/12/091222121815.htm>.
American Chemical Society. (2009, December 23). School classroom air may be more polluted with ultrafine particles than outdoor air. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 17, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/12/091222121815.htm
American Chemical Society. "School classroom air may be more polluted with ultrafine particles than outdoor air." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/12/091222121815.htm (accessed April 17, 2014).

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