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Gene discovery could help to boost crop yields

Date:
August 15, 2010
Source:
University of York
Summary:
A discovery of a vital feature of a plant's temperature sensing and growth mechanism could help to increase yields from crops. Researchers have found a gene that plays a significant role in the growth rate of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana.

A discovery by scientists at the University of York of a vital feature of a plant's temperature sensing and growth mechanism could help to increase yields from crops.

Researchers in the University's Centre for Novel Agricultural Products (CNAP) have found a gene that plays a significant role in the growth rate of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana.

The study published in the latest issue of Current Biology reveals that plants without the SPT gene grow at a faster rate at lower temperatures, but nevertheless have the same tolerance to freezing as plants that have the gene.

The research also shows that daytime temperatures have a particular influence on plant growth and that the SPT gene allows plants' to measure temperature in the morning.

Because most British crops are winter varieties that are sown in the autumn and harvested the following summer, plants that can grow larger during the lower temperatures of autumn, winter and spring have the potential to yield more biomass and larger numbers of seeds.

CNAP's Dr Steve Penfield, who led the research team said: "There is potential for this discovery to be used to increase crop yields by extending the growing season particularly in spring and autumn."

The research also involved scientists from the Institute of Molecular Plant Sciences in the School of Biological Sciences at the University of Edinburgh.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of York. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Kate Sidaway-Lee, Eve-Marie Josse, Alanna Brown, Yinbo Gan, Karen J. Halliday, Ian A. Graham, and Steven Penfield. SPATULA Links Daytime Temperature and Plant Growth Rate. Current Biology, 2010; DOI: 10.1016/j.cub.2010.07.028

Cite This Page:

University of York. "Gene discovery could help to boost crop yields." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 15 August 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/08/100812171941.htm>.
University of York. (2010, August 15). Gene discovery could help to boost crop yields. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 20, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/08/100812171941.htm
University of York. "Gene discovery could help to boost crop yields." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/08/100812171941.htm (accessed October 20, 2014).

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