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Compound in daffodils targets brain cancer

Date:
November 3, 2010
Source:
Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology
Summary:
When looking for new ways to treat aggressive brain cancers, an international team of scientists turned a new leaf and "discovered" the lowly daffodil. A new research study offers hope that a natural compound found in daffodil bulbs, called narciclasine, may be a powerful therapeutic against biologically aggressive forms of human brain cancers.

When looking for new ways to treat aggressive brain cancers, an international team of scientists turned a new leaf and "discovered" the lowly daffodil. A new research study published in the November 2010 print issue of The FASEB Journal offers hope that a natural compound found in daffodil bulbs, called narciclasine, may be a powerful therapeutic against biologically aggressive forms of human brain cancers.

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"We are planning to move a narciclasine derivative toward clinical trials in oncology within a three to four year period in order to help patients with brain cancers, including gliomas, as well as brain metastases," said Robert Kiss, Ph.D., co-author of the study from the Laboratory of Toxicology at the Institute of Pharmacy at the Universitι Libre de Bruxelles in Brussels, Belgium. "We hope narciclasine could be given to brain cancer patients in addition to conventional therapies."

To make this discovery, Kiss and colleagues used computer-assisted techniques to identify targets for narciclasine in cancer cells. The strongest potential candidate to emerge was the eEF1A elongation factor. Researchers then grafted human melanoma brain metastatic cells into the brains of genetically altered mice. Results showed that the injected mice survived significantly longer when treated with narciclasine than those mice left untreated. The researchers believe that narciclasine selectively inhibits the proliferation of very aggressive cancer cells, while avoiding adverse effects on normal cells. Narciclasine could be used in the near future to combat brain cancers, including gliomas, and metastases such as melanoma brain metastases.

"Scientists have been digging in odd corners to find effective treatments for brain cancer for decades, and now they've found one in daffodils." said Gerald Weissmann, M.D., Editor-in-Chief of The FASEB Journal, "It doesn't mean that you should eat daisies or daffodils for what ails you, but that modern medicinal chemistry can pluck new chemicals from stuff that grows in the garden. This is a good one!"


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. G. Van Goietsenoven, J. Hutton, J.-P. Becker, B. Lallemand, F. Robert, F. Lefranc, C. Pirker, G. Vandenbussche, P. Van Antwerpen, A. Evidente, W. Berger, M. Prevost, J. Pelletier, R. Kiss, T. Goss Kinzy, A. Kornienko, V. Mathieu. Targeting of eEF1A with Amaryllidaceae isocarbostyrils as a strategy to combat melanomas. The FASEB Journal, 2010; DOI: 10.1096/fj.10-162263

Cite This Page:

Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology. "Compound in daffodils targets brain cancer." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 3 November 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/11/101101115612.htm>.
Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology. (2010, November 3). Compound in daffodils targets brain cancer. ScienceDaily. Retrieved December 19, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/11/101101115612.htm
Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology. "Compound in daffodils targets brain cancer." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/11/101101115612.htm (accessed December 19, 2014).

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