Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

New dietary supplement reference materials could be 'berry' useful

Date:
November 11, 2010
Source:
National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)
Summary:
Researchers have developed new certified reference materials for measuring amounts of organic acids in dietary supplements formulated with Vaccinium berries -- cranberries, blueberries and bilberries. Manufacturers and researchers can use this new suite of standard reference materials as quality assurance tools.

Previously, measurements of organic acid ratios in berries, fruit juices and dietary supplements had relied on references that do not take into account the complexity of the whole berry. NIST's new matrix-matched certified references correct this problem. From top to bottom and left to right: SRM 3282 Low-Calorie Cranberry Juice Cocktail, SRM 3281 Cranberry (Fruit), SRM 3283 Cranberry Extract, and SRM 3284 Cranberry-Containing Solid Oral Dosage Form.
Credit: NIST

National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) researchers have developed new certified reference materials for measuring amounts of organic acids in dietary supplements formulated with Vaccinium berries -- cranberries, blueberries and bilberries. As described in a recent paper, manufacturers and researchers can use this new suite of standard reference materialsTM (SRMs) as quality assurance tools. berry SRMs

Dietary supplement manufacturers often include health claims on products made with Vaccinium berries. Suggested benefits include prevention of urinary tract infections, reduced risk of certain cancers or Alzheimer's disease, and improved night vision. Consumers may take such claims at face value, but one common problem with dietary supplement products containing berries is the risk of economic adulteration -- dilution with less expensive juices, such as apple or grape, or the use of blueberries instead of bilberries as a cost-saver for the manufacturer. One way of telling whether or not a product has been adulterated is to measure organic acid ratios, which are specific to each type of berry.

Until now, analytical approaches for measuring organic acid ratios in berries, fruit juices, and dietary supplements have relied on the use of pure organic acid reference standards, which do not take into account the complexity of the whole berry. As a result, these methods could neither be validated as accurate nor used to certify reference materials to meet the needs and accuracy requirements of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and dietary supplement manufacturers.

NIST's new certified reference materials are:

  • SRM 3281 Cranberry (Fruit)
  • SRM 3282 Low-Calorie Cranberry Juice Cocktail
  • SRM 3283 Cranberry Extract,
  • SRM 3284 Cranberry-Containing Solid Oral Dosage Form
  • SRM 3285 Mixed Berry-Containing Solid Oral Dosage Form
  • SRM 3287 Blueberry (Fruit)
  • SRM 3291 Bilberry Extract.

The seven SRMs were created as part of an ongoing collaboration to develop dietary supplement SRMs, involving NIST, the National Institutes of Health's Office of Dietary Supplements, and the FDA's Center for Drug Evaluation and Research.

SRMs are among the most widely distributed and used NIST products. The agency prepares, analyzes and distributes more than 1,000 different carefully characterized materials that are used throughout the world to check the accuracy of instruments and test procedures used in manufacturing, clinical chemistry, environmental monitoring, electronics, criminal forensics and dozens of other fields. For more information, see NIST's SRM website.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Melissa M. Phillips, Ryan J. Case, Catherine A. Rimmer, Lane C. Sander, Katherine E. Sharpless, Stephen A. Wise, James H. Yen. Determination of organic acids in Vaccinium berry standard reference materials. Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry, 2010; 398 (1): 425 DOI: 10.1007/s00216-010-3916-0

Cite This Page:

National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). "New dietary supplement reference materials could be 'berry' useful." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 11 November 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/11/101110113044.htm>.
National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). (2010, November 11). New dietary supplement reference materials could be 'berry' useful. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 31, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/11/101110113044.htm
National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). "New dietary supplement reference materials could be 'berry' useful." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/11/101110113044.htm (accessed July 31, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Thursday, July 31, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

House Republicans Vote to Sue Obama Over Healthcare Law

House Republicans Vote to Sue Obama Over Healthcare Law

Reuters - US Online Video (July 31, 2014) The Republican-led House of Representatives votes to sue President Obama, accusing him of overstepping his executive authority in making changes to the Affordable Care Act. Mana Rabiee reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Despite Health Questions, E-Cigs Are Beneficial: Study

Despite Health Questions, E-Cigs Are Beneficial: Study

Newsy (July 31, 2014) Citing 81 previous studies, new research out of London suggests the benefits of smoking e-cigarettes instead of regular ones outweighs the risks. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Dangerous Bacteria Kills One in Florida

Dangerous Bacteria Kills One in Florida

AP (July 31, 2014) Sarasota County, Florida health officials have issued a warning against eating raw oysters and exposing open wounds to coastal and inland waters after a dangerous bacteria killed one person and made another sick. (July 31) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Health Insurers' Profits Slide

Health Insurers' Profits Slide

Reuters - Business Video Online (July 30, 2014) Obamacare-related costs were said to be behind the profit plunge at Wellpoint and Humana, but Wellpoint sees the new exchanges boosting its earnings for the full year. Fred Katayama reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



    Save/Print:
    Share:

    Free Subscriptions


    Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

    Get Social & Mobile


    Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

    Have Feedback?


    Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
    Mobile: iPhone Android Web
    Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
    Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
    Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins