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Host-pathogen biology: Genes used by some infectious bacteria to overwhelm plant defenses identified

Date:
March 3, 2011
Source:
Norwich BioScience Institutes
Summary:
Plants are able to protect themselves from most bacteria, but some bacteria are able to breach their defenses. Scientists have now identified the genes used by some strains of the bacterium Pseudomonas to overwhelm defensive natural products produced by plants of the mustard family, or crucifers.

Plants are able to protect themselves from most bacteria, but some bacteria are able to breach their defenses. In research to be published in Science on March 4, scientists have identified the genes used by some strains of the bacterium Pseudomonas to overwhelm defensive natural products produced by plants of the mustard family, or crucifers.

"Microbes only become pathogens when they find a way to infect a host and overwhelm the host defenses," said lead author Dr Jun Fan from the John Innes Centre on the Norwich Research Park.

"Our findings answer some important questions about host-pathogen biology."

The scientists have confirmed that the chemicals used by cruciferous plants to defend against bacteria are isothiocyanates, nitrogen and sulphur-containing organic compounds produced by plants of the mustard family, such as cabbage, broccoli and Brussels sprouts. These potent molecules have antioxidant, anticancer and anti-inflammatory properties in humans.

Isothiocyanates are released by the plant when it is challenged or eaten. They had previously been shown to be active against bacteria but this is the first time their essential role has been successfully tested using real plants. Without this class of compounds, crucifers would be more vulnerable to disease from a much wider variety of bacteria.

Isothiocyanates also provide a chemical barrier to harmful fungi and a toxic defense warning to insects and other herbivores.

The team of scientists from JIC and the University of Edinburgh found that bacterial pathogens carrying the sax genes, thought to be involved in detoxification and removal of isothiocyanates, were able to overcome these defenses.

Understanding how some bacterial strains become specialized to overcome plant resistance will help scientists identify new ways to improve crop plants.

"These discoveries have a broader significance for current efforts to increase food security," said co-author Dr Peter Doerner from Edinburgh University.

"They define a strategy for sustainable disease control in agriculture by stimulating the production and variety of natural products in various crop plants."

The research was initiated by former JIC director Professor Chris Lamb and he is an author on the paper.

"Chris supported the research for over a decade up until his death in 2009," said Dr Fan.

"This is a good example of his pursuit of excellence and relevance in scientific research."

The work at JIC was funded by the BBSRC.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Norwich BioScience Institutes. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Jun Fan, Casey Crooks, Gary Creissen, Lionel Hill, Shirley Fairhurst, Peter Doerner, and Chris Lamb. Pseudomonas sax Genes Overcome Aliphatic Isothiocyanate–Mediated Non-Host Resistance in Arabidopsis. Science, 4 March 2011: Vol. 331 no. 6021 pp. 1185-1188 DOI: 10.1126/science.1199707

Cite This Page:

Norwich BioScience Institutes. "Host-pathogen biology: Genes used by some infectious bacteria to overwhelm plant defenses identified." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 3 March 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/03/110303141547.htm>.
Norwich BioScience Institutes. (2011, March 3). Host-pathogen biology: Genes used by some infectious bacteria to overwhelm plant defenses identified. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 31, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/03/110303141547.htm
Norwich BioScience Institutes. "Host-pathogen biology: Genes used by some infectious bacteria to overwhelm plant defenses identified." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/03/110303141547.htm (accessed August 31, 2014).

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