Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Tiny antibody fragments raised in camels find drug targets in human breast cancer cells

Date:
April 13, 2011
Source:
Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology
Summary:
A new discovery promises to help physicians identify patients most likely to benefit from breast cancer drug therapies. If the compound, called "Nanobody," proves effective in clinical trials, it would represent a significant advance for breast cancer drug therapy.

Researchers have discovered that tiny antibody fragments raised in camels can find drug targets in human breast cancer cells.
Credit: Oleg Seleznev / Fotolia

A new discovery published online in The FASEB Journal promises to help physicians identify patients most likely to benefit from breast cancer drug therapies. If the compound, called "Nanobody," proves effective in clinical trials, it would represent a significant advance for breast cancer drug therapy because some drugs are effective only in some people.

Related Articles


In addition, some drugs have side effects that may cause damage to vital organs, making it more crucial for physicians to get the right treatment to the right patient the first time around.

"What makes Nanobodies so promising is that they are robust, small enough for rapid elimination from the body, and easy to produce at a relatively low cost," said Ilse Vaneycken, M.Sc., a researcher involved in the work.

To make this discovery, Vaneycken and her colleagues started with the target of the therapeutic drugs (HER2) and immunized a dromedary camel to raise special antibodies unique to this species. Next, all unnecessary parts of the camel's antibodies were removed and cloned in bacteria. Of 100 million bacterial clones, the team selected those that produced the 40 Nanobodies that recognized― or bound to―the same site targeted by therapeutic drugs. Of this group, the team screened for compounds that picked out breast cancer cells bearing the genetic tag HER2. Their lead compound did just that, and without blocking access to cancer-killing drugs now in use. Other properties of Nanobodies, such as good expression, stability, and visibility―enabled breast cancer tumors to be stained and seen rapidly―were also exploited.

"The scientists went over the hump to get to the lump so to speak," said Gerald Weissmann, M.D., Editor-in-Chief of The FASEB Journal. "This technique not only promises to help doctors target cancer cells with effective drugs today, but to pick out other discrete cancer targets in the future."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. I. Vaneycken, N. Devoogdt, N. Van Gassen, C. Vincke, C. Xavier, U. Wernery, S. Muyldermans, T. Lahoutte, V. Caveliers. Preclinical screening of anti-HER2 nanobodies for molecular imaging of breast cancer. The FASEB Journal, 2011; DOI: 10.1096/fj.10-180331

Cite This Page:

Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology. "Tiny antibody fragments raised in camels find drug targets in human breast cancer cells." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 13 April 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/04/110411152639.htm>.
Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology. (2011, April 13). Tiny antibody fragments raised in camels find drug targets in human breast cancer cells. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 26, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/04/110411152639.htm
Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology. "Tiny antibody fragments raised in camels find drug targets in human breast cancer cells." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/04/110411152639.htm (accessed November 26, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Wednesday, November 26, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Pet Dogs to Be Used in Anti-Ageing Trial

Pet Dogs to Be Used in Anti-Ageing Trial

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Nov. 26, 2014) Researchers in the United States are preparing to discover whether a drug commonly used in human organ transplants can extend the lifespan and health quality of pet dogs. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Today's Prostheses Are More Capable Than Ever

Today's Prostheses Are More Capable Than Ever

Newsy (Nov. 26, 2014) Advances in prosthetics are making replacement body parts stronger and more lifelike than they’ve ever been. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
From Popcorn To Vending Snacks: FDA Ups Calorie Count Rules

From Popcorn To Vending Snacks: FDA Ups Calorie Count Rules

Newsy (Nov. 25, 2014) The US FDA is announcing new calorie rules on Tuesday that will require everywhere from theaters to vending machines to include calorie counts. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Daily Serving Of Yogurt Could Reduce Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes

Daily Serving Of Yogurt Could Reduce Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes

Newsy (Nov. 25, 2014) Need another reason to eat yogurt every day? Researchers now say it could reduce a person's risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins