Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Scientists identify order of mutations that lead to cancer

Date:
June 30, 2011
Source:
American Association for Cancer Research
Summary:
Scientists have begun to reveal the order of the genetic aberrations in individual cancers in a finding they say is key to early diagnosis and personalized medicine.

Scientists have begun to reveal the order of the genetic aberrations in individual cancers in a finding they say is key to early diagnosis and personalized medicine.

Related Articles


"We know that each cancer is a collection of genetic malfunctions," said Raymond Cho, Ph.D., an assistant clinical professor in the department of dermatology at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF). "We now show it is possible to determine which changes happen earlier and which ones happen further down the road, even in a single cancer."

Cho and colleagues reported the findings in Cancer Discovery, the newest journal of the American Association for Cancer Research. He said the work was the result of collaboration among UCSF, the Oregon Health & Science University, the University of California at Berkley and the Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology.

The researchers focused on TP53, a known oncogene present in cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas and serous ovarian adenocarcinomas. By examining how additional copies of the mutant oncogene accumulated, they found that complex changes in TP53 occurred earlier in most cases, rather than later, as had been previously believed.

According to the study, the ability to identify the actual sequence of mutations will help scientists to determine which mutations lead to precancerous lesions and which produce invasive carcinomas.

"Although cancers carry many mutations, the ones that always happen earliest set the stage for additional abnormalities," said Cho.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Association for Cancer Research. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. S. Durinck, C. Ho, N. J. Wang, W. Liao, L. R. Jakkula, E. A. Collisson, J. Pons, S.-W. Chan, E. T. Lam, C. Chu, K. Park, S.-w. Hong, J. S. Hur, N. Huh, I. M. Neuhaus, S. S. Yu, R. C. Grekin, T. M. Mauro, J. E. Cleaver, P.-Y. Kwok, P. E. LeBoit, G. Getz, K. Cibulskis, J. C. Aster, H. Huang, E. Purdom, J. Li, L. Bolund, S. T. Arron, J. W. Gray, P. T. Spellman, R. J. Cho. Temporal Dissection of Tumorigenesis in Primary Cancers. Cancer Discovery, 2011; DOI: 10.1158/2159-8290.CD-11-0028

Cite This Page:

American Association for Cancer Research. "Scientists identify order of mutations that lead to cancer." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 30 June 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/06/110629132521.htm>.
American Association for Cancer Research. (2011, June 30). Scientists identify order of mutations that lead to cancer. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 23, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/06/110629132521.htm
American Association for Cancer Research. "Scientists identify order of mutations that lead to cancer." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/06/110629132521.htm (accessed October 23, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Thursday, October 23, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Ebola Fears Keep Guinea Hospitals Empty

Ebola Fears Keep Guinea Hospitals Empty

AP (Oct. 23, 2014) Fears of Ebola are keeping doctors and patients alike away from hospitals in the West African nation of Guinea. (Oct. 23) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Orthodontist Mom Jennifer Salzer on the Best Time for Braces

Orthodontist Mom Jennifer Salzer on the Best Time for Braces

Working Mother (Oct. 22, 2014) Is your child ready? Video provided by Working Mother
Powered by NewsLook.com
U.S. Issues Ebola Travel Restrictions, Are Visa Bans Next?

U.S. Issues Ebola Travel Restrictions, Are Visa Bans Next?

Newsy (Oct. 22, 2014) Now that the U.S. is restricting travel from West Africa, some are dropping questions about a travel ban and instead asking about visa bans. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
More People Diagnosed With TB In 2013, But There's Good News

More People Diagnosed With TB In 2013, But There's Good News

Newsy (Oct. 22, 2014) The World Health Organizations says TB numbers rose in 2013, but it's partly due to better detection and more survivors. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins