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Genetically engineered spider silk for gene therapy

Date:
August 11, 2011
Source:
American Chemical Society
Summary:
Genetically engineered spider silk could help overcome a major barrier to the use of gene therapy in everyday medicine, according to a new study.

Fluorescent signals indicate that a gene in a gene therapy experiment has successfully reached its target — human breast cancer cells growing in lab mice.
Credit: ACS

Genetically engineered spider silk could help overcome a major barrier to the use of gene therapy in everyday medicine, according to a new study that reported development and successful initial laboratory tests of such a material. It appears in ACS' journal Bioconjugate Chemistry.

David Kaplan and colleagues note that gene therapy -- the use of beneficial genes to prevent or treat disease -- requires safe and efficient carriers or "vectors." Those carriers are the counterparts to pills and capsules, transporting therapeutic genes into cells in the body. Safety and other concerns surround the experimental use of viruses to insert genes. The lack of good gene delivery systems is a main reason why there are no FDA-approved gene therapies, despite almost 1,500 clinical trials since 1989. The new study focused on one promising prospect, silk proteins, which are biocompatible and have been used in everyday medicine and medical research for decades.

The scientists describe modifying spider silk proteins so that they attach to diseased cells and not healthy cells. They also engineered the spider silk to contain a gene that codes for the protein that makes fireflies glow in order to provide a visual signal (seen using special equipment) that the gene has reached its intended target. In lab studies using mice containing human breast cancer cells, the spider-silk proteins attached to the cancer cells and injected the DNA material into the cells without harming the mice.

The results suggest that the genetically-engineered spider-silk proteins represent "a versatile and useful new platform polymer for nonviral gene delivery," the article notes.

The authors acknowledged funding from the National Institutes of Health and the National Science Foundation.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Chemical Society. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Keiji Numata, Michaela R Reagan, Robert H Goldstein, Michael Rosenblatt, David L Kaplan. Spider Silk-Based Gene Carriers for Tumor Cell-Specific Delivery. Bioconjugate Chemistry, 2011; 110712095946020 DOI: 10.1021/bc200170u

Cite This Page:

American Chemical Society. "Genetically engineered spider silk for gene therapy." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 11 August 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/08/110810101559.htm>.
American Chemical Society. (2011, August 11). Genetically engineered spider silk for gene therapy. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 22, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/08/110810101559.htm
American Chemical Society. "Genetically engineered spider silk for gene therapy." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/08/110810101559.htm (accessed October 22, 2014).

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