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Death from above: Parasite wasps attacking ants from the air filmed for the first time

Date:
October 6, 2011
Source:
Pensoft Publishers
Summary:
Flight attacks of small parasitoid wasps (no larger than two millimeters in size) on ant workers have been filmed by researchers. The four species of wasps show amazing adaptations and enormous differences in the tactics they use. Two of the four filmed species are new to science.

A female parasitoid wasp of Kollasmosoma sentum new species attacks an ant worker of Cataglyphis ibericus; all in 0.05 seconds.
Credit: José María Gómez Durán

Flight attacks of small parasitoid wasps (no larger than 2.0 mm in size) on ant workers have been filmed by José María Gómez Durán from Madrid. The four species of wasps show amazing adaptations and enormous differences in the tactics they use. Two of the four filmed species are new to science and are described by Dr Kees van Achterberg from NCB Naturalis Leiden.

The study was published in the open access journal ZooKeys.

Ants are a very dominant group in nature and well-equipped to defend themselves. Only a few small parasitoids manage to break through their defence, thanks to very different and amazing adaptations. The four filmed species belong to four different genera and two different families of wasps (Braconidae and Ichneumonidae). The eggs of the Braconidae develop inside adult ants. The eggs of the Ichneumonidae, however, develop in the larvae of ants. How the newly developed young wasps manage to survive inside the ant nest is still unknown.

One of the possible explanations is that dead ants may be deposited outside the entrance of the ant nest, thus giving the young wasps a chance to emerge, avoiding a lethal attack on themselves.

Videos of the wasps can be found on Pensoft's YouTube channel:


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Pensoft Publishers. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Cees van Achterberg, José María Durán. Oviposition behaviour of four ant parasitoids (Hymenoptera, Braconidae, Euphorinae, Neoneurini and Ichneumonidae, Hybrizontinae), with the description of three new European species. ZooKeys, 2011; 125 (0): 59 DOI: 10.3897/zookeys.125.1754

Cite This Page:

Pensoft Publishers. "Death from above: Parasite wasps attacking ants from the air filmed for the first time." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 6 October 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/08/110829114554.htm>.
Pensoft Publishers. (2011, October 6). Death from above: Parasite wasps attacking ants from the air filmed for the first time. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 22, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/08/110829114554.htm
Pensoft Publishers. "Death from above: Parasite wasps attacking ants from the air filmed for the first time." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/08/110829114554.htm (accessed August 22, 2014).

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