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Peatland carbon storage is stabilized against catastrophic release of carbon

Date:
November 2, 2011
Source:
American Chemical Society
Summary:
Concerns that global warming may have a domino effect -- unleashing 600 billion tons of carbon in vast expanses of peat in the Northern hemisphere and accelerating warming to disastrous proportions -- may be less justified than previously thought.

Concerns that global warming may have a domino effect -- unleashing 600 billion tons of carbon in vast expanses of peat in the Northern hemisphere and accelerating warming to disastrous proportions -- may be less justified than previously thought. That's the conclusion of a new study on the topic in ACS' journal Environmental Science & Technology.

Christian Blodau and colleagues explain that peat bogs -- wet deposits of partially decayed plants that are the source of gardeners' peat moss and fuel -- hold about one-third of the world's carbon. Scientists have been concerned that global warming might dry out the surface of peatlands, allowing the release into the atmosphere of carbon dioxide and methane (a greenhouse gas even more potent than carbon dioxide) produced from decaying organic matter. To see whether this catastrophic domino effect is a realistic possibility, the scientists conducted laboratory simulations studying the decomposition of wet bog peat for nearly two years.

Far from observing sudden releases of greenhouse gases, they found that carbon release and methane production slowed down considerably in deeply buried wet peat, most likely because deeper peat is shielded from exchange of water and gases with the atmosphere. In connection with previous work, the study concluded that "even under moderately changing climatic conditions," peatlands will continue to sequester, or isolate from the atmosphere, their huge deposits of carbon and methane.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Chemical Society. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Christian Blodau, Melanie Siems, Julia Beer. Experimental Burial Inhibits Methanogenesis and Anaerobic Decomposition in Water-Saturated Peats. Environmental Science & Technology, 2011 DOI: 10.1021/es201777u

Cite This Page:

American Chemical Society. "Peatland carbon storage is stabilized against catastrophic release of carbon." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 2 November 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/11/111102125350.htm>.
American Chemical Society. (2011, November 2). Peatland carbon storage is stabilized against catastrophic release of carbon. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 19, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/11/111102125350.htm
American Chemical Society. "Peatland carbon storage is stabilized against catastrophic release of carbon." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/11/111102125350.htm (accessed April 19, 2014).

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