Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Pharmaceuticals from crab shells

Date:
February 13, 2012
Source:
Vienna University of Technology, TU Vienna
Summary:
Usually, mould fungi are nothing to cheer about – but now they can be used as “chemical factories”. Scientists have succeeded in introducing bacterial genes into the fungus Trichoderma, so that the fungus can now produce important chemicals for the pharmaceutical industry. The raw material used by the fungus is abundant - it is chitin, which makes up the shells of crustaceans.

The fungus Trichoderma (top left) has been genetically modified so that it can produce valuable pharmaceuticals from chitin - a substance found in crab shells.
Credit: Vienna University of Technology / Creative Commons license - Hans Hillewaert.

Usually, mould fungi are nothing to cheer about -- but now they can be used as "chemical factories." Scientists at the Vienna University of Technology have succeeded in introducing bacterial genes into the fungus Trichoderma, so that the fungus can now produce important chemicals for the pharmaceutical industry. The raw material used by the fungus is abundant -- it is chitin, which makes up the shells of crustaceans.

Fifty Times More Expensive than Gold

Viral Infections are usually treated with antiviral drugs, which are often derived from N-Acetylneuraminic acid (or NANA, for short). NANA, which can be obtained form natural sources or synthesized, is fifty times more valuable than gold -- it is sold for around 2000 Euros per gram. A research team at Vienna UT, led by biotechnologist Astrid Mach-Aigner, has now found a new, eco-friendly way to produce NANA. The vast knowledge about the genetics of the fungus Trichoderma accumulated at Vienna UT over the years was crucial for the project.

Bacterial Genes for Mould Fungi

The fungus Trichoderma is very common. It lives in soil, in meadows and trees. "We knew that Trichoderma can degrade chitin -- that's what the fungus naturally does in soil," says Astrid Mach-Aigner. This made Trichoderma a viable candidate for the research project. In order to get the fungus to produce the desired chemical product, bacterial genes had to be introduced into its genome. "Usually, Trichoderma breaks down chitin to monomer amino sugars," says Mach-Aigner. Due to the new genes, two extra reaction steps are now possible -- and eventually the desired pharmaceutical N-Acetylneuraminic acid is produced.

Chitin as a Natural Resource

Chitin is, after cellulose, the most abundant biopolymer on earth. It is found in the carapaces of crustaceans, in the shells of insects, snails and cephalopods and in the cell walls of fungi. It is estimated that in the sea alone, ten billion tons of chitin are formed every year -- several hundred times more than the cumulated body mass of all people on earth. This makes chitin a very sustainable resource for chemical synthesis.

The newly developed Trichoderma line can now be cultivated in bioreactors and produces the precious acid NANA from chitin. The process has now been patented by the Vienna University of Technology and will be used for the cheap and eco-friendly production of pharmaceuticals on an industrial scale in the near future.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Vienna University of Technology, TU Vienna. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Matthias G Steiger, Astrid R Mach-Aigner, Rita Gorsche, Erwin E Rosenberg, Marko D Mihovilovic, Robert L Mach. Synthesis of an antiviral drug precursor from chitin using a saprophyte as a whole-cell catalyst. Microbial Cell Factories, 2011; 10 (1): 102 DOI: 10.1186/1475-2859-10-102

Cite This Page:

Vienna University of Technology, TU Vienna. "Pharmaceuticals from crab shells." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 13 February 2012. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/02/120213083850.htm>.
Vienna University of Technology, TU Vienna. (2012, February 13). Pharmaceuticals from crab shells. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 2, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/02/120213083850.htm
Vienna University of Technology, TU Vienna. "Pharmaceuticals from crab shells." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/02/120213083850.htm (accessed September 2, 2014).

Share This




More Plants & Animals News

Tuesday, September 2, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

We've Got Mites Living In Our Faces And So Do You

We've Got Mites Living In Our Faces And So Do You

Newsy (Aug. 30, 2014) A new study suggests 100 percent of adult humans (those over 18 years of age) have Demodex mites living in their faces. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Washington Wildlife Center Goes Nuts Over Baby Squirrels

Washington Wildlife Center Goes Nuts Over Baby Squirrels

Reuters - US Online Video (Aug. 30, 2014) An animal rescue in Washington state receives an influx of orphaned squirrels, keeping workers busy as they nurse them back to health. Rough Cut (no reporter narration). Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Experimental Ebola Drug ZMapp Cures Lab Monkeys Of Disease

Experimental Ebola Drug ZMapp Cures Lab Monkeys Of Disease

Newsy (Aug. 29, 2014) In a new study, a promising experimental treatment for Ebola managed to cure a group of infected macaque monkeys. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Killer Amoeba Found in Louisiana Water System

Killer Amoeba Found in Louisiana Water System

AP (Aug. 28, 2014) State health officials say testing has confirmed the presence of a killer amoeba in a water system serving three St. John the Baptist Parish towns. (Aug. 28) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins