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Animal health breakthrough: Research uncovers genetic marker that could help control, eliminate PRRS virus

Date:
March 15, 2012
Source:
Kansas State University
Summary:
Scientists have recently discovered a genetic marker that identifies pigs with reduced susceptibility to porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome, or PRRS. The discovery may improve animal health and save the U.S. pork industry millions of dollars each year.

A collaborative discovery involving Kansas State University researchers may improve animal health and save the U.S. pork industry millions of dollars each year.

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Raymond "Bob" Rowland, a virologist and professor of diagnostic medicine and pathobiology, was part of the collaborative effort that discovered a genetic marker that identifies pigs with reduced susceptibility to porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome, or PRRS. This virus costs the U.S. pork industry more than $600 million each year.

"This discovery is what you call a first-first," Rowland said. "This discovery is the first of its kind for PRRS but also for any large food animal infectious disease. I have worked in the field for 20 years and this is one of the biggest advances I have seen."

Rowland and researchers Jack Dekkers from Iowa State University and Joan Lunney from the Agricultural Research Service discovered a genetic marker called a quantitative trait locus, or QTL, which is associated with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus susceptibility. This discovery is a first step in controlling and eliminating the virus.

The research recently appeared in the Journal of Animal Science. The project's beginning and future center around Kansas State University, Rowland said.

It begins at the university because Rowland is involved with an organization called the PRRS Host Genetics Consortium, or PHGC, which initiated and provided more than $5 million for the research. Rowland is co-director of the consortium, which is a collaboration among the United States Department of Agriculture, the National Pork Board and Genome Canada as well as universities and industry members. Rowland is also director of the USDA-funded PRRS Coordinated Agriculture Project, known as PRRS CAP.

"The PRRS Host Genetics Consortium takes fundamental science and turns it into utility," Rowland said.

Kansas State University's new Large Animal Research Center is the site of much of the project's experimental work. The researchers obtain multiple measurements -- including growth, weight gain, performance and virus measurements -- over time. They have collected samples from more than 2,000 pigs since they began the study in 2007, for a total of more than 100,000 samples that are stored or distributed to the consortium's collaborators.

The university shipped samples to the Agricultural Research Service for genomic DNA preparations to identify differences among more than 60,000 genes. The data was transferred to Iowa State University for genetic analysis that led to the discovery of the QTL.

The collaborators at Iowa State University created a common database so that all the data collected during the project can be accessed at multiple locations by researchers and the breeding industry for the next several decades.

"A unique aspect of this project is that we have been looking at genes that may provide long-term resistance to a lot of infections," Rowland said. "This is very important for animal health because there are a lot of diseases for which there are no cures and no vaccines. Now we have a tool to study these diseases."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Kansas State University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. N. Boddicker, E. H. Waide, R. R. R. Rowland, J. K. Lunney, D. J. Garrick, J. M. Reecy, J. C. M. Dekkers. Evidence for a major QTL associated with host response to Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome virus challenge. Journal of Animal Science, 2011; DOI: 10.2527/jas.2011-4464

Cite This Page:

Kansas State University. "Animal health breakthrough: Research uncovers genetic marker that could help control, eliminate PRRS virus." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 15 March 2012. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/03/120315105905.htm>.
Kansas State University. (2012, March 15). Animal health breakthrough: Research uncovers genetic marker that could help control, eliminate PRRS virus. ScienceDaily. Retrieved December 19, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/03/120315105905.htm
Kansas State University. "Animal health breakthrough: Research uncovers genetic marker that could help control, eliminate PRRS virus." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/03/120315105905.htm (accessed December 19, 2014).

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