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Exposure to bisphenol A (BPA) early in life results in high levels of anxiety; Soy mitigates effects, study shows

Date:
September 7, 2012
Source:
North Carolina State University
Summary:
New research led by researchers at North Carolina State University shows that exposure to the chemical bisphenol A early in life results in high levels of anxiety by causing significant gene expression changes in a specific region of the brain called the amygdala. The researchers also found that a soy-rich diet can mitigate these effects.

New research led by researchers at North Carolina State University shows that exposure to the chemical bisphenol A (BPA) early in life results in high levels of anxiety by causing significant gene expression changes in a specific region of the brain called the amygdala. The researchers also found that a soy-rich diet can mitigate these effects.

"We knew that BPA could cause anxiety in a variety of species, and wanted to begin to understand why and how that happens," says Dr. Heather Patisaul, an associate professor of biology at NC State and lead author of a paper describing the work. BPA is a chemical used in a wide variety of polycarbonate plastics and epoxy resins, and is used in consumer products such as some food containers.

In the study, rats were exposed to low doses of BPA during gestation, lactation (nursing) and through puberty. One group of animals was fed only soy; one group was fed a soy-free diet; one group was fed only soy and exposed to BPA; and one group was fed no soy and exposed to BPA. Blood tests showed that the animals exposed to BPA had BPA levels well within the range found in humans. Similarly, blood tests of animals fed soy showed levels of genistein, an estrogen-like chemical found in soy, were at levels within the human range for vegetarians and others who regularly consume soy foods.

Among adolescent rats on the soy-free diet, both males and females that had been exposed to BPA exhibited significantly higher levels of anxiety. The researchers also found, for the first time, gene changes within the brain associated with this elevated anxiety.

Specifically, the study reveals that gene expression changes in the amygdala, a brain region known to play a role in mediating responses to fear and stress, are associated with the behavioral changes. Two of the affected genes were estrogen receptor beta and the melanocortin receptor 4. Both are required for oxytocin release, thus changes in oxytocin/vasopressin signaling pathways may underpin the behavioral changes. Oxytocin is a hormone and neurotransmitter that has been linked to social behavior.

However, the researchers also found that adolescent rats on the soy-rich diet did not exhibit anxiety -- suggesting that the soy-rich diet may mitigate the effects of BPA. But a soy-rich diet raises questions of its own.

"Soy contains phytoestrogens that can also affect the endocrine system, which regulates hormones," Patisaul says. "It is not clear whether these phytoestrogens are what mitigate the effect of BPA, or if it is something else entirely. That's a question we're hoping to address in future research."

The paper, "Anxiogenic effects of developmental Bisphenol A exposure 1 are associated with gene expression changes in the juvenile rat amygdala and mitigated by soy," was published Sept. 5 in the journal PLoS ONE. The paper was co-authored by Patisaul; NC State Ph.D. student Alana Sullivan; NC State master's student Meghan Radford; former NC State student Dr. Heather Adewale; Deena Walker and Dr. Andrea Gore of the University of Texas at Austin; and Bozena Winnik, Janis Coughlin and Dr. Brian Buckley of Rutgers University. The research was funded by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by North Carolina State University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Heather B. Patisaul, Alana W. Sullivan, Meghan E. Radford, Deena M. Walker, Heather B. Adewale, Bozena Winnik, Janis L. Coughlin, Brian Buckley, Andrea C. Gore. Anxiogenic Effects of Developmental Bisphenol A Exposure Are Associated with Gene Expression Changes in the Juvenile Rat Amygdala and Mitigated by Soy. PLoS ONE, 2012; 7 (9): e43890 DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0043890

Cite This Page:

North Carolina State University. "Exposure to bisphenol A (BPA) early in life results in high levels of anxiety; Soy mitigates effects, study shows." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 7 September 2012. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/09/120907131638.htm>.
North Carolina State University. (2012, September 7). Exposure to bisphenol A (BPA) early in life results in high levels of anxiety; Soy mitigates effects, study shows. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 15, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/09/120907131638.htm
North Carolina State University. "Exposure to bisphenol A (BPA) early in life results in high levels of anxiety; Soy mitigates effects, study shows." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/09/120907131638.htm (accessed September 15, 2014).

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