Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Animal model of typhoid fever could lead to better vaccines

Date:
October 25, 2012
Source:
Cell Press
Summary:
The first mouse model of the common bacterial disease typhoid fever is reported in a new study. Because the animals show human-like symptoms and respond positively to immunization, they could be used to develop more effective vaccines against the deadly pathogen.

The first mouse model of the common bacterial disease typhoid fever is reported in a study published by Cell Press October 25 in the journal Cell. Because the animals show human-like symptoms and respond positively to immunization, they could be used to develop more effective vaccines against the deadly pathogen.

"Prior to our work, there was no small animal model for studying immune responses to the bacteria that cause typhoid fever," says study author Matthew Hayden of Columbia University. "We hope that the model we have developed will promote rapid progress in developing better vaccines."

Typhoid fever is characterized by rash and severe diarrhea, and it causes more than 220,000 deaths each year, frequently in developing countries lacking clean sources of drinking water. It is caused by the bacterium Salmonella typhi (S. Typhi), which normally infects humans but not mice. Unlike humans, mice express toll-like receptor 11 (TLR11), an immune cell receptor that recognizes molecules found in a range of microbes and triggers immune responses that help to fight infections.

"The two vaccines currently approved for this disease are only modestly effective, so research aimed at improving vaccines is essential," says senior study author Sankar Ghosh of Columbia University.

Because TLR11 is highly expressed in the mouse intestine, Hayden and his colleagues suspected that this receptor might recognize pathogens that cause intestinal diseases and could be responsible for preventing typhoid fever in mice. To answer these questions, the researchers inactivated the tlr11 gene in mice and exposed them to S. Typhi. These mice developed severe intestinal tissue damage and hallmark symptoms such as fever and diarrhea. But when the mice were first immunized with heat-killed S. Typhi, they mounted strong immune responses and became impervious to infection.

Moreover, the researchers found that the key component responsible for S. Typhi's virulence is a protein called flagellin, which is recognized by TLR11. Because other pathogens have flagellin, these mice might also serve as a model system for other important bacterial diseases. "Having an animal model vastly improves our ability to investigate diseases, the immune response and, importantly, can be immensely beneficial for efforts to develop new vaccines and therapies," Hayden says.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Cell Press. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Ramkumar Mathur, Hyunju Oh, Dekai Zhang, Sung-Gyoo Park, Jin Seo, Alicia Koblansky, MatthewS. Hayden, Sankar Ghosh. A Mouse Model of Salmonella Typhi Infection. Cell, 2012; 151 (3): 590 DOI: 10.1016/j.cell.2012.08.042

Cite This Page:

Cell Press. "Animal model of typhoid fever could lead to better vaccines." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 25 October 2012. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/10/121025122222.htm>.
Cell Press. (2012, October 25). Animal model of typhoid fever could lead to better vaccines. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 21, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/10/121025122222.htm
Cell Press. "Animal model of typhoid fever could lead to better vaccines." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/10/121025122222.htm (accessed October 21, 2014).

Share This



More Plants & Animals News

Tuesday, October 21, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

'Cadaver Dog' Sniffs out Human Remains

'Cadaver Dog' Sniffs out Human Remains

AP (Oct. 21, 2014) Where's a body buried? Buster's nose can often tell you. He's a cadaver dog, specially trained to find human remains and increasingly being used by law enforcement and accepted in courts. These dogs are helping solve even decades-old mysteries. (Oct. 21) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
White Lion Cubs Born in Belgrade Zoo

White Lion Cubs Born in Belgrade Zoo

AFP (Oct. 20, 2014) Two white lion cubs, an extremely rare subspecies of the African lion, were recently born at Belgrade Zoo. They are being bottle fed by zoo keepers after they were rejected by their mother after birth. Duration: 00:42 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Traditional Farming Methods Gaining Ground in Mali

Traditional Farming Methods Gaining Ground in Mali

AFP (Oct. 20, 2014) He is leading a one man agricultural revolution in Mali - Oumar Diatabe uses traditional farming methods to get the most out of his land and is teaching others across the country how to do the same. Duration: 01:44 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Goliath Spider Will Give You Nightmares

Goliath Spider Will Give You Nightmares

Buzz60 (Oct. 20, 2014) An entomologist stumbled upon a South American Goliath Birdeater. With a name like that, you know it's a terrifying creepy crawler. Sean Dowling (@SeanDowlingTV) has the details. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Plants & Animals

Earth & Climate

Fossils & Ruins

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins