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Lions are rapidly losing ground in Africa

Date:
December 4, 2012
Source:
Panthera
Summary:
A new study confirms that lions are rapidly and literally losing ground across Africa's once-thriving savannahs due to burgeoning human population growth and subsequent, massive land-use conversion. Representing the most comprehensive assessment of the state and vitality of African savannah habitat to date, the report maintains that the lion has lost 75 percent of its original natural habitat in Africa – a reduction that has devastated lion populations across the continent.

A new study confirms that lions are rapidly and literally losing ground across Africa's once-thriving savannahs due to burgeoning human population growth and subsequent, massive land-use conversion. Representing the most comprehensive assessment of the state and vitality of African savannah habitat to date, the report maintains that the lion has lost 75% of its original natural habitat in Africa -- a reduction that has devastated lion populations across the continent.

Co-authored by Panthera's Lion Program Survey Coordinator, Dr. Philipp Henschel, and a team of researchers coordinated by Duke University's Nicholas School of the Environment, this report, entitled "The size of savannah Africa: A lion's (Panthera leo) view," was published online this week in the journal Biodiversity and Conservation.

Using Google Earth's high-resolution satellite imagery, the study examined savannah habitat across Africa, which comprises the majority of the lion's current range, and also analyzed human population density data to identify areas of suitable habitat currently occupied by lions. Incredibly, the analysis identified only 67 isolated regions across the continent where significant lion populations may persist. Of these areas, just 15 were estimated to maintain a population of at least 500 lions.

"The reality is that from an original area a third larger than the continental United States, only 25% remains," explained Stuart Pimm, co-author and Doris Duke Chair of Conservation at Duke University.

The study also confirms that in West Africa, where the species is classified as Regionally Endangered on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species, fewer than 500 lions remain, scattered across eight isolated regions.

"Lions have been hit hardest in West Africa, where local governments often lack direct incentives to protect them," Dr. Henschel commented. "While lions generate billions of tourist dollars across Eastern and Southern Africa, spurring governments to invest in their protection, wildlife-based tourism is only slowly developing in West Africa. Currently lions still have little economic value in the region, and West African governments will require significant foreign assistance in stabilizing remaining populations until sustainable local conservation efforts can be developed."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Panthera. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Jason Riggio, Andrew Jacobson, Luke Dollar, Hans Bauer, Matthew Becker, Amy Dickman, Paul Funston, Rosemary Groom, Philipp Henschel, Hans Iongh, Laly Lichtenfeld, Stuart Pimm. The size of savannah Africa: a lion’s (Panthera leo) view. Biodiversity and Conservation, 2012; DOI: 10.1007/s10531-012-0381-4

Cite This Page:

Panthera. "Lions are rapidly losing ground in Africa." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 4 December 2012. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/12/121204145830.htm>.
Panthera. (2012, December 4). Lions are rapidly losing ground in Africa. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 23, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/12/121204145830.htm
Panthera. "Lions are rapidly losing ground in Africa." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/12/121204145830.htm (accessed July 23, 2014).

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African Savannah -- And Its Lions -- Declining at Alarming Rates

Dec. 4, 2012 About 75 percent of Africa's savannahs and more than two-thirds of the lion population once estimated to live there have disappeared in the last 50 years, according to a new ... read more
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