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Scientists develop monkey model to study novel coronavirus infection

Date:
April 3, 2013
Source:
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases
Summary:
Researchers have developed a model of infection in rhesus macaques that will help scientists around the world better understand how an emerging coronavirus, first identified in Sept. 2012, affects people. The virus has so far infected at least 17 people in the Middle East and Europe, killing 11 of them.

This image shows a transmission electron micrograph of novel coronavirus particles, colorized in yellow.
Credit: NIAID/RML

National Institutes of Health (NIH) researchers have developed a model of infection in rhesus macaques that will help scientists around the world better understand how an emerging coronavirus, first identified in September 2012, affects people.

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The virus has so far infected at least 17 people in the Middle East and Europe, killing 11 of them. The NIH team established the nonhuman primate model in December 2012 and is using it to study how the virus causes disease and to evaluate potential vaccines and antiviral treatments.

The model shows that clinical signs of coronavirus disease appear within 24 hours of infection. These signs include reduced appetite, elevated temperature, increased respiratory rate, cough, goose bumps and hunched posture. In monkeys and humans, the infection causes disease deep in the lungs, leading to pneumonia. Scientists are exploring whether the virus' foothold in the lower respiratory tract impedes its ability to spread efficiently.

Researchers at NIH's National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) developed the model after obtaining coronavirus samples from collaborators at Erasmus Medical Center in The Netherlands.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Munster et al. Novel Human Coronavirus Causes Pneumonia in a Macaque Model Resembling Human Disease. New England Journal of Medicine, 2013; DOI: 10.1056/NEJMc1215691

Cite This Page:

NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. "Scientists develop monkey model to study novel coronavirus infection." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 3 April 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/04/130403200258.htm>.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. (2013, April 3). Scientists develop monkey model to study novel coronavirus infection. ScienceDaily. Retrieved March 6, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/04/130403200258.htm
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. "Scientists develop monkey model to study novel coronavirus infection." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/04/130403200258.htm (accessed March 6, 2015).

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