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A new species of yellow slug moth from China

Date:
June 4, 2013
Source:
Pensoft Publishers
Summary:
A new species of the slug moth genus Monema has been described from China. The name refers to the peculiar caterpillars resembling slugs in many of their characteristics. The recent study of the representatives of the Monema genus in China records four species in total and a subspecies present in the country.

This image shows the newly discovered moth M. tanaognatha.
Credit: Zhaohui Pan; CC-BY 3.0

The moth genus Monema is represented by medium-sized yellowish species. The genus belongs to the Limacodidae family also known as the slug moths due to the distinct resemblance of their caterpillars to some slug species. Some people know this family as the cup moths, the name derived from the peculiar looking, hard shell cocoon they form.

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A recent study of the representatives of the Monema genus in China records 4 species and a subspecies present in the country, one of which is newly described to science. The new species has the characteristic yellow coloration for the genus, with a face blending from yellow to pale red. The study was published in the open access journal Zookeys.

The larvae of the genus like most larvae in the family bear close resemblance to slugs. They are typically very flattened, and instead of legs they have suckers which help them move by rolling waves rather than walking with individual legs. Another similar to slugs characteristic is the fact they use a lubricant to help their movement, which is a kind of liquified silk.

M. flavescens is an important pest of many trees in China. Prior to the present study the new species and M. meyi have been mistaken for the M. flavescens and therefore the works on their biology need to be revised. The morphology of larvae, host plants and bionomics of these 3 closely related species will be studied in the future.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Pensoft Publishers. The original story is licensed under a Creative Commons License. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Zhaohui Pan, Chao-Dong Zhu, Chunsheng Wu. A review of the genus Monema Walker in China (Lepidoptera, Limacodidae). ZooKeys, 2013; 306: 23 DOI: 10.3897/zookeys.306.5216

Cite This Page:

Pensoft Publishers. "A new species of yellow slug moth from China." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 4 June 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/06/130604113426.htm>.
Pensoft Publishers. (2013, June 4). A new species of yellow slug moth from China. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 23, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/06/130604113426.htm
Pensoft Publishers. "A new species of yellow slug moth from China." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/06/130604113426.htm (accessed November 23, 2014).

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