Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Protein complex linked to cancer growth may also help fight tumors

Date:
July 22, 2013
Source:
Moffitt Cancer Center
Summary:
Researchers have discovered a gene expression signature that may lead to new immune therapies for lung cancer patients. They found that NF-κB, a protein complex known to promote tumor growth, may also have the ability to boost the immune system to eliminate cancerous cells before they harm, as well as promote antitumor responses.

Researchers at Moffitt Cancer Center and Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital in China have discovered a gene expression signature that may lead to new immune therapies for lung cancer patients. They found that NF-κB, a protein complex known to promote tumor growth, may also have the ability to boost the immune system to eliminate cancerous cells before they harm, as well as promote antitumor responses.

The study appeared in the June 3 issue of The Journal of Clinical Investigation.

NF-κB is a protein complex that controls gene expression. The regulation of NF-κB also plays an important role in regulating the body's immune response to infection. Incorrect regulation of NF-kB has been linked to cancer, inflammatory and autoimmune diseases, septic shock, viral infection, and improper immune development.

"New insight into how tumor pathways regulate the anti-tumor immune response may help us to devise new ways for improving immune therapy," said study lead author Amer Beg, Ph.D., senior member of Moffitt's Immunology Program. "Studies are now underway to start a clinical trial to determine whether the novel gene expression signature described in this work may help initiate new and better immunotherapy treatments."

According to Beg, NF-κB proteins regulate key genes involved in immune response, inflammation, cell death and cell growth. Work in his lab is aimed at a better understanding of how NF-κB regulates immune response and how the consequences of impaired regulation of responses are related to disease.

The researchers analyzed the role of NF-κB in lung cancer cells that were used to develop the NF-κB gene signature. Key studies in mice showed that NF-κB can mediate immune rejection of tumors. The studies were then extended to human tumor specimens. "In this study we found that NF-κB activity is strongly associated with immune system T-cell infiltration in lung cancer," explained study co-author Dung-Tsa Chen, Ph.D., member of the Biostatistics Department at Moffitt. "Multiple genes, capable of enhancing T-cell responses, were found in the NF-κB signature. This means that NF-κB, thought of as a tumor promoter, also helps facilitate an immune response."

Their finding -- that the presence of high levels of NF-κB in lung cancer tumors can act as a suppressor -- provides new insight into how tumor pathways regulate the anti-tumor response.

"T-cell presence in tumors can be associated with immune surveillance and improved patient survival," explained Beg. "The focus of immune therapy, boosting T cell-induced responses against solid tumors, has shown considerable promise. However, tolerance-inducing mechanisms and the presence of suppressive cell types in the tumor microenvironment can dampen the response to immunotherapy. Our findings provide new insights into beneficial pathways that also operate in tumors and can regulate anti-tumor responses."

This work was supported by a National Cancer Institute lung cancer SPORE grant (P50 CA119997), the National Functional Genomics Center, and the James and Esther King Biomedical Research Program.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Moffitt Cancer Center. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Emily L. Hopewell, Weipeng Zhao, William J. Fulp, Crystina C. Bronk, Alexis S. Lopez, Michael Massengill, Scott Antonia, Esteban Celis, Eric B. Haura, Steven A. Enkemann, Dung-Tsa Chen, Amer A. Beg. Lung tumor NF-κB signaling promotes T cell–mediated immune surveillance. Journal of Clinical Investigation, 2013; 123 (6): 2509 DOI: 10.1172/JCI67250

Cite This Page:

Moffitt Cancer Center. "Protein complex linked to cancer growth may also help fight tumors." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 22 July 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/07/130722122905.htm>.
Moffitt Cancer Center. (2013, July 22). Protein complex linked to cancer growth may also help fight tumors. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 25, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/07/130722122905.htm
Moffitt Cancer Center. "Protein complex linked to cancer growth may also help fight tumors." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/07/130722122905.htm (accessed July 25, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Friday, July 25, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Beatings and Addiction: Pakistan Drug 'clinic' Tortures Patients

Beatings and Addiction: Pakistan Drug 'clinic' Tortures Patients

AFP (July 24, 2014) A so-called drugs rehab 'clinic' is closed down in Pakistan after police find scores of ‘patients’ chained up alleging serial abuse. Duration 03:05 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Too Few Teens Receiving HPV Vaccination, CDC Says

Too Few Teens Receiving HPV Vaccination, CDC Says

Newsy (July 24, 2014) The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is blaming doctors for the low number of children being vaccinated for HPV. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
New Painkiller Designed To Discourage Abuse: Will It Work?

New Painkiller Designed To Discourage Abuse: Will It Work?

Newsy (July 24, 2014) The FDA approved Targiniq ER on Wednesday, a painkiller designed to keep users from abusing it. Like any new medication, however, it has doubters. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Doctor At Forefront Of Fighting Ebola Outbreak Gets Ebola

Doctor At Forefront Of Fighting Ebola Outbreak Gets Ebola

Newsy (July 24, 2014) Sheik Umar Khan has treated many of the people infected in the Ebola outbreak, and now he's become one of them. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins