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Virus-derived particles target blood cancer

Date:
August 13, 2013
Source:
Ottawa Hospital Research Institute
Summary:
Researchers have developed unique virus-derived particles that can kill human blood cancer cells in the laboratory and eradicate the disease in mice with few side effects.

Ottawa researchers have developed unique virus-derived particles that can kill human blood cancer cells in the laboratory and eradicate the disease in mice with few side effects.
Credit: Image courtesy of Ottawa Hospital Research Institute

Ottawa researchers have developed unique virus-derived particles that can kill human blood cancer cells in the laboratory and eradicate the disease in mice with few side effects. The study is published in Blood Cancer Journal by co-senior authors Drs. David Conrad and John Bell of the Ottawa Hospital Research Institute (OHRI) and the University of Ottawa (uOttawa).

While Dr. Bell and his colleagues have been investigating replicating viruses for the treatment of solid cancers for many years, with very promising results, this is the first major success they have had treating blood cancer (leukemia). It is also the first success they have had using a non-replicating virus-derived particle as opposed to a replicating virus.

"Our research indicated that a replicating virus might not be the safest or most effective approach for treating leukemia, so we decided to investigate whether we could make virus-derived particles that no longer replicate but still kill cancer," said Dr. Conrad, a hematologist conducting research in the Blood and Marrow Transplant Program at The Ottawa Hospital, and currently completing his PhD at OHRI and uOttawa in the Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine. "We were delighted to see that this novel therapy was very safe at high doses, and worked extremely well in our laboratory leukemia models. We hope to test this in patients in the near future."

The researchers used a specific method and dose of UV light to transform regular replicating viruses into unique particles that could no longer replicate and spread, but could still enter cancer cells efficiently, kill them and stimulate a strong immune response against the cancer. These particles were able to kill multiple forms of leukemia in the laboratory, including samples taken from local patients who had failed all other therapies. Normal blood cells were not affected. This novel treatment was also successful in mouse models of leukemia. In fact, 80 per cent of the mice that received the therapy had markedly prolonged survival and 60 per cent were eventually cured, while all of the untreated mice died of their leukemia within 20 days.

"Leukemia is a devastating disease that can be very difficult to treat, and new therapies are urgently needed," said Dr. Conrad. "While we're still at the early stages of this research, I think this therapy holds a lot of promise because it appears to have a potent, long-lasting effect on leukemia without the debilitating side effects of many cancer therapies used in the clinic right now. We will likely see even better results once we optimize the dose in our preparations to advance this research into human clinical trials."

This research was funded by the Ontario Institute for Cancer Research, the Terry Fox Foundation, the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, Ottawa's Department of Medicine and The Ottawa Hospital Foundation.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Ottawa Hospital Research Institute. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. C Batenchuk, F Le Boeuf, L Stubbert, T Falls, H L Atkins, J C Bell, D P Conrad. Non-replicating rhabdovirus-derived particles (NRRPs) eradicate acute leukemia by direct cytolysis and induction of antitumor immunity. Blood Cancer Journal, 2013; 3 (7): e123 DOI: 10.1038/bcj.2013.23

Cite This Page:

Ottawa Hospital Research Institute. "Virus-derived particles target blood cancer." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 13 August 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/08/130813101929.htm>.
Ottawa Hospital Research Institute. (2013, August 13). Virus-derived particles target blood cancer. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 20, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/08/130813101929.htm
Ottawa Hospital Research Institute. "Virus-derived particles target blood cancer." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/08/130813101929.htm (accessed April 20, 2014).

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