Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Key cellular mechanism in body's 'battery' can either spur or stop obesity

Date:
September 26, 2013
Source:
Yale University
Summary:
Becoming obese or remaining lean can depend on the dynamics of the mitochondria, the body's energy-producing "battery," according to two new studies.

Becoming obese or remaining lean can depend on the dynamics of the mitochondria, the body's energy-producing "battery," according to two new studies by Yale School of Medicine researchers featured as the cover story in the Sept. 26 issue of the journal Cell.

Mitochondria are vital cellular organelles that generate and maintain proper energy levels in complex organisms. Using animal models, the Yale research team studied mitochondria in different populations of brain cells known to be involved in the regulation of appetite. The team found that during the transition from a fasting to an over-fed state, mitochondria in neurons that promote hunger show dynamic changes that are the opposite of those found in neurons that control feelings of fullness.

"We've found that mitochondrion need to have ongoing dynamic plasticity in order to support neurons, which are necessary for appetite and for the maintenance of life," said lead author Tamas Horvath, the Jean and David W. Wallace Professor of Biomedical Research and chair of comparative medicine at Yale School of Medicine. "If these dynamic events -- during which the mitochondria fuse to become more effective in generating energy -- are disrupted, mitochondria become static, appetite-stimulating neurons become less active, and animals do not develop obesity when exposed to high-fat, high-calorie diets."

Yale co-lead author Dr. Marcelo de Oliveira Dietrich said these same cellular events have different consequences in neurons that promote feelings of fullness. These consequences were described in a separate paper in the same issue of Cell, co-authored by Dietrich, Horvath, and a research team in Spain.

The study showed that similar molecular drivers control mitochondria-endoplasmic reticulum interactions and related stress. If the cellular events are disrupted in these mitochondria, animals become morbidly obese.

"The generally accepted view has been that once a cellular biological principle is established in a model system, that principle would hold for most cells of the body. That is clearly not the case here," said Horvath, who points out some practical consideration from the results.

"For example, the mitochondria have been implicated in the development of chronic diseases such as diabetes, cancer, and neurodegeneration, and targeting mitochondria is an emerging therapeutic approach," he notes. "Our results raise doubt about the rationale of systematically targeting any specific mitochondrial mechanism for the treatment of chronic diseases, because in one cell or tissue, it may result in a very different, potentially undesired outcome than in the other."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Yale University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Marc Schneeberger, Marcelo O. Dietrich, David Sebastián, Mónica Imbernón, Carlos Castaño, Ainhoa Garcia, Yaiza Esteban, Alba Gonzalez-Franquesa, Ignacio Castrillón Rodríguez, Analía Bortolozzi, Pablo M. Garcia-Roves, Ramon Gomis, Ruben Nogueiras, Tamas L. Horvath, Antonio Zorzano, Marc Claret. Mitofusin 2 in POMC Neurons Connects ER Stress with Leptin Resistance and Energy Imbalance. Cell, 2013; 155 (1): 172 DOI: 10.1016/j.cell.2013.09.003

Cite This Page:

Yale University. "Key cellular mechanism in body's 'battery' can either spur or stop obesity." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 26 September 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/09/130926123336.htm>.
Yale University. (2013, September 26). Key cellular mechanism in body's 'battery' can either spur or stop obesity. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 27, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/09/130926123336.htm
Yale University. "Key cellular mechanism in body's 'battery' can either spur or stop obesity." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/09/130926123336.htm (accessed August 27, 2014).

Share This




More Plants & Animals News

Wednesday, August 27, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Super Healthful Fruits and Vegetables: Which Are Best?

Super Healthful Fruits and Vegetables: Which Are Best?

Ivanhoe (Aug. 27, 2014) — We all know that it is important to eat our fruits and vegetables but do you know which ones are the best for you? Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com
Bad Memories Turn Good In Weird Mouse Brain Study

Bad Memories Turn Good In Weird Mouse Brain Study

Newsy (Aug. 27, 2014) — MIT researchers were able to change whether bad memories in mice made them anxious by flicking an emotional switch in the brain. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Do Couples Who Smoke Weed Together Stay Together?

Do Couples Who Smoke Weed Together Stay Together?

Newsy (Aug. 27, 2014) — A study out of University at Buffalo claims couples who smoke marijuana are less likely to experience intimate partner violence. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Panda Might Have Faked Pregnancy To Get Special Treatment

Panda Might Have Faked Pregnancy To Get Special Treatment

Newsy (Aug. 27, 2014) — A panda in China showed pregnancy symptoms that disappeared after two months of observation. One theory: Her pseudopregnancy was a ploy for perks. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins