Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Genetic chip will help salmon farmers breed better fish

Date:
February 13, 2014
Source:
University of Edinburgh
Summary:
Atlantic salmon production could be boosted by a new technology that will help select the best fish for breeding.

Researchers have developed a gene chip that will help salmon farmers select the best fish for breeding.
Credit: Landcatch Natural Selection

Atlantic salmon production could be boosted by a new technology that will help select the best fish for breeding.

The development will enable salmon breeders to improve the quality of their stock and its resistance to disease.

A chip loaded with hundreds of thousands of pieces of DNA -- each holding a fragment of the salmon's genetic code -- will allow breeders to detect fish with the best genes.

It does so by detecting variations in the genetic code of each individual fish -- known as single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). These variations make it possible to identify genes that are linked to desirable physical traits, such as growth or resistance to problematic diseases, for example sea lice infestations.

Salmon breeders will be able to carry out the test by taking a small sample of fin tissue.

The chip carries over twenty times more genetic information than existing tools. Similar chips have already transformed breeding programmes for land-farmed livestock including cattle and pigs.

Salmon farming contributes around half a billion pounds to the UK economy each year and provides healthy, high quality food. Worldwide, approximately 1.5 million tonnes of Atlantic salmon are produced every year.

Scientists from the University of Edinburgh's Roslin Institute and Edinburgh Genomics initiative developed the chip with researchers from the Universities of Stirling and Glasgow. They worked with industrial partners Affymetrix UK and Landcatch Natural Selection. The work was funded by the UK's innovation agency -- the Technology Strategy Board -- and the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council.

The chip is highlighted in a study published today in the journal BMC Genomics and it will be available to breeders and farmers from March 2014.

Dr Ross Houston, of The Roslin Institute, said: "Selective breeding programmes have been used to improve salmon stocks since the 1970s. This new technology will allow the best breeding fish to be selected more efficiently and accurately, particularly those with characteristics that are difficult to measure such as resistance to disease"

Dr Alan Tinch, director of genetics at Landcatch Natural Selection, said: "This development takes selective breeding programmes to a whole new level. It is an extension to the selective breeding of salmon allowing more accurate identification of the best fish to create healthier and more robust offspring."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Edinburgh. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Ross D Houston, John B Taggart, Timoth้ C้zard, Micha๋l Bekaert, Natalie R Lowe, Alison Downing, Richard Talbot, Stephen C Bishop, Alan L Archibald, James E Bron, David J Penman, Alessandro Davassi, Fiona Brew, Alan E Tinch, Karim Gharbi, Alastair Hamilton. Development and validation of a high density SNP genotyping array for Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar). BMC Genomics, 2014; 15 (1): 90 DOI: 10.1186/1471-2164-15-90

Cite This Page:

University of Edinburgh. "Genetic chip will help salmon farmers breed better fish." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 13 February 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/02/140213220427.htm>.
University of Edinburgh. (2014, February 13). Genetic chip will help salmon farmers breed better fish. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 23, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/02/140213220427.htm
University of Edinburgh. "Genetic chip will help salmon farmers breed better fish." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/02/140213220427.htm (accessed April 23, 2014).

Share This



More Plants & Animals News

Wednesday, April 23, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Monkeys Are Better At Math Than We Thought, Study Shows

Monkeys Are Better At Math Than We Thought, Study Shows

Newsy (Apr. 23, 2014) — A Harvard University study suggests monkeys can use symbols to perform basic math calculations. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Raw: Leopard Bites Man in India

Raw: Leopard Bites Man in India

AP (Apr. 22, 2014) — A leopard caused panic in the city of Chandrapur on Monday when it sprung from the roof of a house and charged at rescue workers. (April 22) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Iowa College Finds Beauty in Bulldogs

Iowa College Finds Beauty in Bulldogs

AP (Apr. 22, 2014) — Drake University hosts 35th annual Beautiful Bulldog Contest. (April 21) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
805-Pound Shark Caught Off The Coast Of Florida

805-Pound Shark Caught Off The Coast Of Florida

Newsy (Apr. 22, 2014) — One Florida fisherman caught a 805-pound shark off the coast of Florida earlier this month. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins