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New field guide for Africa's mammalian eden

Date:
June 10, 2014
Source:
Wildlife Conservation Society
Summary:
From the kipunji -- a secretive primate species first discovered by WCS in 2003 -- to the Indo-Pacific Humpback Dolphin, Tanzania is known for its staggering variety of large mammals including the largest diversity of primates in mainland Africa. A new field guide documents this dazzling array of mammals.
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From the kipunji -- a secretive primate species first discovered by WCS in 2003 -- to the Indo-Pacific Humpback Dolphin, Tanzania is known for its staggering variety of large mammals including the largest diversity of primates in mainland Africa.

A new field guide authored by conservationists from the Wildlife Conservation Society, Tanzania Wildlife Research Institute, and the Zoological Society of London documents this dazzling array of mammals. Called "A Field Guide to Larger Mammals of Tanzania" the new guide chronicles all the larger mammals of Tanzania, including marine mammals and newly discovered species.

Authors include Charles Foley, assistant country director for the Wildlife Conservation Society in Tanzania; Lara Foley, program manager of the Wildlife Conservation Society's Tarangire Elephant Project; Alex Lobora, senior research officer at the Tanzania Wildlife Research Institute; Daniela De Luca, senior scientist for the Wildlife Conservation Society's conservation programs in the Southern Highlands of Tanzania and Zanzibar, Maurus Msuha, head of wildlife information and education at the Tanzania Wildlife Research Institute; Tim Davenport is country director for the Wildlife Conservation Society in Tanzania; and Sarah Durant, senior research fellow at the Zoological Society of London's Institute of Zoology.

Tanzania is Home to the Serengeti National Park, Ngorongoro Crater, and Mount Kilimanjaro and offers some of the finest big game watching in the world, from elephants and rhinos to chimpanzees and lions.

Said co-author Tim Davenport: "As well as compiling all historical information, this new guide book is the culmination of our collective 100 years in the bush in Tanzania. We hope it will be of value to safari-goers, natural historians and conservationists alike."

WCS Executive Director for Africa Programs James Deutsch called the book: "The much awaited, much needed, definitive field guide to the mammals of the most important country in the world for seeing and conserving wildlife."

Detailed accounts are provided for more than 135 species, along with color photos, color illustrations of marine mammals, and distribution maps. Accounts for land species give information on identification, subspecies, similar species, ecology, behavior, distribution, conservation status, and where best to see each species.

In addition, the guide features plates with side-by-side photographic comparisons of species that are easily confused, as well as first-time-ever species checklists for every national park.


Story Source:

The above post is reprinted from materials provided by Wildlife Conservation Society. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Wildlife Conservation Society. "New field guide for Africa's mammalian eden." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 10 June 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/06/140610144358.htm>.
Wildlife Conservation Society. (2014, June 10). New field guide for Africa's mammalian eden. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 3, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/06/140610144358.htm
Wildlife Conservation Society. "New field guide for Africa's mammalian eden." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/06/140610144358.htm (accessed September 3, 2015).

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