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Sunblock poses potential hazard to sea life

Date:
August 20, 2014
Source:
American Chemical Society
Summary:
The sweet and salty aroma of sunscreen and seawater signals a relaxing trip to the shore. But scientists are now reporting that the idyllic beach vacation comes with an environmental hitch. When certain sunblock ingredients wash off skin and into the sea, they can become toxic to some of the ocean's tiniest inhabitants, which are the main course for many other marine animals.
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When certain sunblock ingredients wash off skin and into the sea, they can become toxic to some of the ocean's tiniest inhabitants, which are the main course for many other marine animals.
Credit: © Gabriele Maltinti / Fotolia

The sweet and salty aroma of sunscreen and seawater signals a relaxing trip to the shore. But scientists are now reporting that the idyllic beach vacation comes with an environmental hitch. When certain sunblock ingredients wash off skin and into the sea, they can become toxic to some of the ocean's tiniest inhabitants, which are the main course for many other marine animals. Their study appears in the ACS journal Environmental Science & Technology.

Antonio Tovar-Sanchez and David Sánchez-Quiles point out that other than staying indoors, slathering on sunscreen is currently the best way to protect skin from the sun's harmful rays. But when sunbathers splash into the ocean to cool off, some of their lotions and creams get rinsed into the water. The problem is that titanium dioxide and zinc oxide nanoparticles, which are common ingredients in sunblock, can react with ultraviolet light from the sun and form new compounds, such as hydrogen peroxide, that could be toxic.

High amounts of hydrogen peroxide can harm phytoplankton, the microscopic algae that feed everything from small fish to shrimp to whales. The scientists wanted to figure out just how serious of an impact beachgoers could be having on life in coastal waters.

To investigate the matter, they hit the beach. They went to Majorca Island's Palmira beach on the Mediterranean along with about 10,000 beachgoers, a small portion of the more than 200 million tourists that flock to Mediterranean shores every year. Based on lab tests, seawater sampling and tourism data, the researchers concluded that titanium dioxide from sunblock was largely responsible for a dramatic summertime spike in hydrogen peroxide levels in coastal waters -- with potentially dangerous consequences for aquatic life.


Story Source:

The above post is reprinted from materials provided by American Chemical Society. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. David Sánchez-Quiles, Antonio Tovar-Sánchez. Sunscreens as a Source of Hydrogen Peroxide Production in Coastal Waters. Environmental Science & Technology, 2014; 48 (16): 9037 DOI: 10.1021/es5020696

Cite This Page:

American Chemical Society. "Sunblock poses potential hazard to sea life." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 20 August 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/08/140820110540.htm>.
American Chemical Society. (2014, August 20). Sunblock poses potential hazard to sea life. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 31, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/08/140820110540.htm
American Chemical Society. "Sunblock poses potential hazard to sea life." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/08/140820110540.htm (accessed July 31, 2015).

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