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Landmark Study Identifies Large Number Of New Proteins Implicated In Huntington's Disease

Date:
May 11, 2007
Source:
Buck Institute for Age Research
Summary:
Scientists have identified more than 200 new proteins that bind to normal and mutant forms of the protein that causes Huntington's disease. Huntington's disease is a fatal inherited disease that affects 30,000 Americans annually by laying waste to their nervous system.
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Researchers from four organizations have identified more than 200 new proteins that bind to normal and mutant forms of the protein that causes Huntington's disease (HD). HD is a fatal inherited disease that affects 30,000 Americans annually by laying waste to their nervous system.

The work, which involved high-tech screening of the human genome and proteome, was unprecedented both in terms of its scale and in the way the protein interactions were validated in a genetic model of the disease. By conducting additional experiments in fruit flies genetically altered to express features of human HD, scientists showed that changing the expression of these interacting proteins affected the degree of damage seen in the fly neurons. This indicates that a significant number of the proteins might be potential drug targets for HD.

Now that researchers have discovered the interacting proteins using human libraries and human protein extracts and tested them in the fly, Lead researcher Robert Hughes says the next step is to bring the research back into the mammalian world. The new genes and proteins discovered in this study are being screened and analyzed in cultured mammalian cells; the ones that show activity in ongoing experiments will be tested in mouse models of HD.

"Here at the Buck Institute, we're going to be focusing on a few dozen proteins," said Hughes. "Effective follow-up on any target protein depends, in large part, on how much expertise a scientist has with that target. We are hoping that researchers will look at this study and that those with specific expertise in a particular protein will move forward with their own inquiries."

The work was supported by HD advocacy organizations. "We are very excited about this significant discovery," said Allan Tobin, PhD, Senior Scientific Advisor to the High Q Foundation and CHDI, Inc. "This work helps define and refine possible therapeutic targets for a disease that lacks thorough understanding." Tobin added, "We are pleased this study is being published in an open-access journal, which makes it easier for scientists at other organizations to get to work on following up on this landmark discovery." Traditional peer-reviewed journals usually require scientists to pay a fee to access study results.

Tobin added that the need for further scientific inquiry is urgent. There is currently no effective treatment or cure for HD, which is typically characterized by involuntary movements and dementia. The disease slowly diminishes a person's ability to move, think and communicate. Those affected eventually become totally dependent on others for their care and usually die from complications such as choking, heart failure or infection.

The disease is hereditary; each child of a person with HD has a 50/50 chance of inheriting the fatal gene. Approximately 200,000 Americans are believed to be at risk of developing HD, a disease that affects as many people as hemophilia, cystic fibrosis or muscular dystrophy. The symptoms of HD typically begin to appear in mid-life, although the progression of the disease varies among individuals and within the same family.

The research was led by Buck Institute faculty member Robert E. Hughes, PhD. Results of the study, which may facilitate the discovery of an effective treatment for HD, were published in the May 11 edition of PLoS Genetics.

Joining Hughes as co-authors of the paper are Buck Institute scientists Cameron Torcassi, and Lisa Ellerby; along with Eliana Romano and Juan Botas from the Baylor College of Medicine in Houston; Andrew Strand, and James Olson from the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle; and Linda Kaltenbach, Sudhir Sahasrabudhe, Cornelia Kurschner, and John M. Peltier of Prolexys Pharmaceuticals in Salt Lake City. The work was supported by grants from the HighQ Foundation, CCHI Inc, the Hereditary Disease Foundation and National Institutes of Health.


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Cite This Page:

Buck Institute for Age Research. "Landmark Study Identifies Large Number Of New Proteins Implicated In Huntington's Disease." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 11 May 2007. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/05/070511073359.htm>.
Buck Institute for Age Research. (2007, May 11). Landmark Study Identifies Large Number Of New Proteins Implicated In Huntington's Disease. ScienceDaily. Retrieved May 23, 2017 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/05/070511073359.htm
Buck Institute for Age Research. "Landmark Study Identifies Large Number Of New Proteins Implicated In Huntington's Disease." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/05/070511073359.htm (accessed May 23, 2017).

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