New! Sign up for our free email newsletter.
Science News
from research organizations

More nutritional cassava (yuca) for developing world

Date:
September 11, 2007
Source:
American Chemical Society
Summary:
An intensive international effort to improve the nutritional value of cassava -- a staple food for millions of poverty stricken people in sub-Sahara Africa and other areas -- has led to development of a New form of cassava that may be easier to digest than other varieties. Also known as yuca or manioc, the roots of the plant are similar to potatoes and are often eaten boiled or deep fried.
Share:
FULL STORY

An intensive international effort to improve the nutritional value of cassava -- a staple food for millions of poverty stricken people in sub-Sahara Africa and other areas -- has led to development of a New form of cassava that may be easier to digest than other varieties.

Also known as yuca or manioc, the roots of the plant are similar to potatoes and are often eaten boiled or deep fried. The roots are also used to make flour, tapioca, and a wide range of other food products. While the roots are low in protein and vitamins, they are an abundant source of starch. But the starch contains relatively high levels of amylose, which can be difficult to digest.

In the new study, Hernan Ceballos and colleagues identified a variety of cassava with less than 3 percent amylose, compared to 18-24 percent of the hard-to-digest material in traditional cassava. "This is the first report of a natural mutation in cassava that drastically reduces amylose content in root starch," the study states. This mutation may also be better suited for the production of bioethanol, it adds.


Story Source:

Materials provided by American Chemical Society. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Hernán Ceballos, Teresa Sánchez, Nelson Morante, Martin Fregene, Dominique Dufour, Alison M. Smith, Kay Denyer, Juan Carlos Pérez, Fernando Calle, Christian Mestres. Discovery of an Amylose-free Starch Mutant in Cassava (Manihot esculentaCrantz). Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 2007; 55 (18): 7469 DOI: 10.1021/jf070633y

Cite This Page:

American Chemical Society. "More nutritional cassava (yuca) for developing world." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 11 September 2007. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/09/070910100614.htm>.
American Chemical Society. (2007, September 11). More nutritional cassava (yuca) for developing world. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 16, 2024 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/09/070910100614.htm
American Chemical Society. "More nutritional cassava (yuca) for developing world." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/09/070910100614.htm (accessed July 16, 2024).

Explore More

from ScienceDaily

RELATED STORIES