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Pregnancy associated hypertension associated with an increased frequency of subsequent hypertension and metabolic syndrome

Date:
February 2, 2015
Source:
Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine
Summary:
Researchers have found long term cardiovascular and metabolic abnormalities five to ten years later in women with preeclampsia/gestational hypertension during pregnancy.
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In a study to be presented on Feb. 5 in an oral concurrent session at 2:45 p.m. PST, at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine's annual meeting, The Pregnancy Meeting™, in San Diego, researchers of the MFMU Network will present findings of long term cardiovascular and metabolic abnormalities five to ten years later in women with preeclampsia/gestational hypertension during pregnancy.

The study, titled Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes and Subsequent Metabolic Syndrome analyzed 825 women who were followed up approximately seven years after their delivery. At the time of enrollment in the original study, the women were pregnant and had mild gestational diabetes or lesser degrees of abnormal glucose values, but did not have a prior history of gestational diabetes mellitus or diabetes, chronic hypertension or renal or cardiovascular disease. At follow-up, women had anthropometric and blood pressure measurements, provided blood for laboratory measurements and were asked about medications and diet. A majority of the women were noted to have high waist circumference and low HDL-C at follow up.

The research concluded that in an obstetric population with no preexisting conditions, and no or only mild GDM in the index pregnancy, pregnancy associated hypertension, particularly when delivery occurred preterm, was associated with a higher frequency of subsequent hypertension and metabolic syndrome in the mother five to ten years later.

"This study provides additional support of the concept of pregnancy as a window to future health and the need for physicians to continue to monitor and counsel patients with conditions such as preeclampsia and gestational hypertension, especially if its onset was early or if the woman also delivered preterm," stated Madeline Rice, Ph.D., of the Milken Institute School of Public Health at the George Washington University, on behalf of the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Maternal-Fetal Medicine Units Network in Bethesda, Md.


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Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine. "Pregnancy associated hypertension associated with an increased frequency of subsequent hypertension and metabolic syndrome." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 2 February 2015. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/02/150202105737.htm>.
Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine. (2015, February 2). Pregnancy associated hypertension associated with an increased frequency of subsequent hypertension and metabolic syndrome. ScienceDaily. Retrieved May 23, 2017 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/02/150202105737.htm
Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine. "Pregnancy associated hypertension associated with an increased frequency of subsequent hypertension and metabolic syndrome." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/02/150202105737.htm (accessed May 23, 2017).

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