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Suffering from abuse during childhood increases chances of depression, above all in those adults who are genetically predisposed

Date:
April 13, 2015
Source:
University of Granada
Summary:
The risk of suffering from depression due to abuse during childhood is significantly higher in those patients who are genetically predisposed, a new study shows. “Our results present a fundamental genetic-environmental model to explain this sort of therapeutic response”, conclude the researchers.
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An international research project led by scientists from the U. of Granada has demonstrated that the risk of suffering from depression due to abuse during childhood is significantly higher in those patients who are genetically predisposed.

This research has been published in the prestigious Journal of Psychiatry and Neuroscience, and it has been coordinated by Prof.Blanca Gutiérrez, from the Psychiatry Department at the U. of Granada. Participants include researchers from the CIBERSAM group (UGR Centre for Biomedical Research), the Biostatistics Department at the U. of Granada, King’s College in London, Loyola University in Andalusia, the University of Seville, the University of Zaragoza, the Health Service of La Rioja, the Health Service of the Canary Islands, and the San Cecilio Clinical University Hospital in Granada.

Scientists analysed a sample which consisted of 2.679 primary health care patients from 41 different health clinics in seven different Spanish provinces, between the ages of 18 and 75. They were all followed during a period of three years, and the survey included genetic tests.

The results demonstrated that those individuals who have scarcely functional genes implied in neurotrophism (BDNF) and in serotonin transmission are particularly vulnerable to the noxious effects that childhood abuse (either psychological, physical or sexual) has upon general mood and as a risk factor in clinical depression.

According to prof. Gutiérrez “it is an important result, which proves a triple genetic-environmental sort of interaction whose relevance is even more important if we take into consideration that the response to antidepressants appears to be fundamentally mediated through proteins codified by the two genes we have studied.”

“Our results present a fundamental genetic-environmental model to explain this sort of therapeutic response”, concludes this researcher from the U. of Granada.


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Materials provided by University of Granada. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Blanca Gutiérrez, Juan Ángel Bellón, Margarita Rivera, Esther Molina, Michael King, Louise Marston, Francisco Torres-González, Berta Moreno-Küstner, Patricia Moreno-Peral, Emma Motrico, Carmen Montón-Franco, María Josefa Gilde Gómez-Barragán, Marta Sánchez-Celaya, Miguel Ángel Díaz-Barreiros, Catalina Vicens, Juan de Dios Luna, Irwin Nazareth, Jorge Cervilla. The risk for major depression conferred by childhood maltreatment is multiplied by BDNF and SERT genetic vulnerability: A replication study. J Psychiatry Neurosci, September 2014 DOI: 10.1503/jpn.140097

Cite This Page:

University of Granada. "Suffering from abuse during childhood increases chances of depression, above all in those adults who are genetically predisposed." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 13 April 2015. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/04/150413075142.htm>.
University of Granada. (2015, April 13). Suffering from abuse during childhood increases chances of depression, above all in those adults who are genetically predisposed. ScienceDaily. Retrieved May 23, 2017 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/04/150413075142.htm
University of Granada. "Suffering from abuse during childhood increases chances of depression, above all in those adults who are genetically predisposed." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/04/150413075142.htm (accessed May 23, 2017).

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