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Surgery is more effective than drug in hyperparathyroidism post-kidney transplantation

Date:
December 16, 2015
Source:
IDIBELL-Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute
Summary:
A new study compared the results of surgery with drug therapy in patients with tertiary hyperparathyroidism, i.e., after a kidney transplant.
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A study led by researchers from the Nephrology group at Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL) and the University Hospital of Bellvitge (HUB), compared the results of surgery with drug therapy in patients with tertiary hyperparathyroidism, ie after a kidney transplant. The results of the research have been published in the journal of greatest impact in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

This is the first clinical trial comparing these two treatments for this disease and has been funded by the Carlos III Health Institute within the call for independent clinical research projects.

Tertiary hyperparathyroidism

50% of patients with a kidney transplant presents tertiary hyperparathyroidism. This complication involves too much calcium, causing cardiovascular worsening by hypercalcemia, bone loss, and worsens the survival of the transplanted organ.

The study was performed in 30 patients. Half of them are operated and the other half have been treated with the usual drug. Researchers have found that surgery totally controls hypercalcemia, normalizes the secretion of parathyroid hormone (PTH) and improves bone density. While treatment only controls excess calcium in 67% of cases, has no effect on PTH and even slows the decline in bone density and does not stop the process.

The principal researcher of the study, Josep Maria Cruzado, explained that "if we have a surgical team with experience in this type of operation, our recommendation in these cases is to operate because it is positive both from the viewpoint of efficiency, since surgery It is a curative treatment, and from the economic point of view: the cost of surgery is equivalent to 14 months of treatment, and the drug must be taken chronically and can not be stopped."

The results of this study could change the clinical practice of tertiary hyperparathyroidism.

Cruzado has also explained that it is a minimally invasive surgery and involves only one day of hospitalization.


Story Source:

Materials provided by IDIBELL-Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. J. M. Cruzado, P. Moreno, J. V. Torregrosa, O. Taco, R. Mast, C. Gomez-Vaquero, C. Polo, I. Revuelta, J. Francos, J. Torras, A. Garcia-Barrasa, O. Bestard, J. M. Grinyo. A Randomized Study Comparing Parathyroidectomy with Cinacalcet for Treating Hypercalcemia in Kidney Allograft Recipients with Hyperparathyroidism. Journal of the American Society of Nephrology, 2015; DOI: 10.1681/ASN.2015060622

Cite This Page:

IDIBELL-Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute. "Surgery is more effective than drug in hyperparathyroidism post-kidney transplantation." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 16 December 2015. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/12/151216105307.htm>.
IDIBELL-Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute. (2015, December 16). Surgery is more effective than drug in hyperparathyroidism post-kidney transplantation. ScienceDaily. Retrieved May 24, 2017 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/12/151216105307.htm
IDIBELL-Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute. "Surgery is more effective than drug in hyperparathyroidism post-kidney transplantation." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/12/151216105307.htm (accessed May 24, 2017).

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