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U.S. emergency departments face serious drug shortages

Date:
January 4, 2016
Source:
Wiley
Summary:
A new study reveals that drug shortages affecting emergency care have skyrocketed in the United States in recent years. While the prevalence of such shortages fell from 2002 to 2007; the number of shortages sharply increased by 373 percent (from 26 to 123) from 2008 to 2014.
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A new study reveals that drug shortages affecting emergency care have skyrocketed in the United States in recent years. While the prevalence of such shortages fell from 2002 to 2007; the number of shortages sharply increased by 373% (from 26 to 123) from 2008 to 2014.

These medications are approved, but for various reasons manufacturers cannot meet demands or have stopped making the drugs.

"Many of those medications are for life-threatening conditions, and for some drugs no substitute is available," said Dr. Jess Pines, senior author of the Academic Emergency Medicine study. "This means that in some cases, emergency department physicians may not have the medications they need to help people who are in serious need of them."


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Materials provided by Wiley. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Kristy L. Hawley, Maryann Mazer-Amirshahi, Mark S. Zocchi, Erin R. Fox, Jesse M. Pines. Longitudinal Trends in U.S. Drug Shortages for Medications Used in Emergency Departments (2001-2014). Academic Emergency Medicine, 2015; DOI: 10.1111/acem.12838

Cite This Page:

Wiley. "U.S. emergency departments face serious drug shortages." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 4 January 2016. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/01/160104163655.htm>.
Wiley. (2016, January 4). U.S. emergency departments face serious drug shortages. ScienceDaily. Retrieved May 23, 2017 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/01/160104163655.htm
Wiley. "U.S. emergency departments face serious drug shortages." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/01/160104163655.htm (accessed May 23, 2017).

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