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Beyond dance: Ballet training improves muscle coordination in everyday activities

Date:
January 5, 2016
Source:
American Physiological Society (APS)
Summary:
Professional ballet dancers have more control over their muscles than individuals with no dance training, new research shows.
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FULL STORY

A new article in Journal of Neurophysiology reports that professional ballet dancers have more control over their muscles than individuals with no dance training.

Researchers from Emory University and Georgia Institute of Technology found that ballet training optimized muscle coordination not only for dancing but also everyday movements.

Ballet dancers had better balance and used their muscles more effectively and efficiently. “Identifying how long-term training affects construction, storage and execution of movement may provide valuable insight into unknown mechanisms of motor coordination and motor learning that could guide future rehabilitation efforts,” the research team wrote.


Story Source:

Materials provided by American Physiological Society (APS). Note: Content may be edited for style and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Andrew Sawers, Jessica L. Allen, Lena H. Ting. Long-term training modifies the modular structure and organization of walking balance control. Journal of Neurophysiology, 2015; 114 (6): 3359 DOI: 10.1152/jn.00758.2015

Cite This Page:

American Physiological Society (APS). "Beyond dance: Ballet training improves muscle coordination in everyday activities." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 5 January 2016. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/01/160105102328.htm>.
American Physiological Society (APS). (2016, January 5). Beyond dance: Ballet training improves muscle coordination in everyday activities. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 29, 2016 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/01/160105102328.htm
American Physiological Society (APS). "Beyond dance: Ballet training improves muscle coordination in everyday activities." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/01/160105102328.htm (accessed September 29, 2016).