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Minimal Residual Disease Status, Outcomes in Patients with Multiple Myeloma

Date:
September 19, 2016
Source:
JAMA
Summary:
A new study examines the assessment of minimal residual disease in patients newly treated for multiple myeloma as a factor in survival outcomes.
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A new study published online by JAMA Oncology examines the assessment of minimal residual disease in patients newly treated for multiple myeloma as a factor in survival outcomes.

Nikhil C. Munshi, M.D., of the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, and coauthors examined medical literature in a meta-analysis. Their results suggest that a negative minimal residual disease status after treatment appears to be associated with improved survival.

The authors suggest minimal residual disease status may be a marker of long-term survival outcome and the assessment of minimal residual disease status after treatment should be considered as an end-point in clinical trials.


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Materials provided by JAMA. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Nikhil C. Munshi, Herve Avet-Loiseau, Andy C. Rawstron, Roger G. Owen, J. Anthony Child, Anjan Thakurta, Paul Sherrington, Mehmet Kemal Samur, Anna Georgieva, Kenneth C. Anderson, Walter M. Gregory. Association of Minimal Residual Disease With Superior Survival Outcomes in Patients With Multiple Myeloma. JAMA Oncology, 2016; DOI: 10.1001/jamaoncol.2016.3160

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JAMA. "Minimal Residual Disease Status, Outcomes in Patients with Multiple Myeloma." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 19 September 2016. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/09/160919104426.htm>.
JAMA. (2016, September 19). Minimal Residual Disease Status, Outcomes in Patients with Multiple Myeloma. ScienceDaily. Retrieved May 23, 2017 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/09/160919104426.htm
JAMA. "Minimal Residual Disease Status, Outcomes in Patients with Multiple Myeloma." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/09/160919104426.htm (accessed May 23, 2017).

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