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Analysis examines safety of antidepressant use during pregnancy

Date:
May 17, 2017
Source:
Wiley
Summary:
Use of fluoxetine -- the most commonly prescribed antidepressant -- during pregnancy is linked with a slightly increased risk of malformations in infants, according to a recent analysis.
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Use of fluoxetine -- the most commonly prescribed antidepressant -- during pregnancy is linked with a slightly increased risk of malformations in infants, according to a recent analysis of published studies.

In the analysis of 16 studies, infants exposed to fluoxetine during the first trimester had an 18% increased relative risk of major malformations and a 36% increased relative risk of cardiovascular malformations.

There were no significant observations of other system-specific malformations in the nervous system, eye, urogenital system, digestive system, respiratory system, or musculoskeletal system.

The findings are published in the British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology.

Similar research was published at an earlier time in the British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology.


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Materials provided by Wiley. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Shan-Yan Gao, Qi-Jun Wu, Tie-Ning Zhang, Zi-Qi Shen, Cai-Xia Liu, Xin Xu, Chao Ji, Yu-Hong Zhao. Fluoxetine and congenital malformations: a systematic review and meta-analysis of cohort studies. British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology, 2017; DOI: 10.1111/bcp.13321

Cite This Page:

Wiley. "Analysis examines safety of antidepressant use during pregnancy." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 17 May 2017. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/05/170517090548.htm>.
Wiley. (2017, May 17). Analysis examines safety of antidepressant use during pregnancy. ScienceDaily. Retrieved May 24, 2017 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/05/170517090548.htm
Wiley. "Analysis examines safety of antidepressant use during pregnancy." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/05/170517090548.htm (accessed May 24, 2017).

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