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Three types of work stress increasing in the US

Date:
May 24, 2017
Source:
SUNY Downstate Medical Center
Summary:
Two stressful work characteristics, low job control and 'job strain' -- that is, high-demand, low-control work -- have been increasing in the US since 2002. The findings may explain why declines in cardiovascular disease and related mortality have slowed.
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Researchers at SUNY Downstate Medical Center's School of Public Health have determined that two stressful work characteristics, low job control and "job strain" -- that is, high-demand, low-control work -- have been increasing in the U.S. since 2002.

The findings were presented at the Seventh International Commission on Occupational Health (ICOH) Conference on Work Environment and Cardiovascular Diseases, in Varese, Italy, by Paul A. Landsbergis, PhD, EdD, MPH, associate professor in the Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, and earlier by lead author and SUNY Downstate Doctor of Public Health candidate Stephanie Myers at SUNY Downstate Research Day in Brooklyn, NY.

Dr. Landsbergis said, "We determined that two stressful work characteristics, low job control, and 'job strain,' or high-demand, low-control work, have been increasing in the U.S. since 2002. Both of these job stressors are risk factors for cardiovascular disease, or CVD."

He continued, "This may help to explain why the years-long declines in the incidence of CVD and mortality from CVD have slowed." Dr. Landsbergis added, "We also found an increase in 'work-family conflict,' which likely reflects increasing burdens faced by working parents in the U.S."

This is the first analysis looking at trends in work characteristics over 12 years using Quality of Work Life (QWL) surveys developed by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The four surveys analyzed (2002, 2006, 2010, and 2014) are based on representative samples of the U.S. employed population.


Story Source:

Materials provided by SUNY Downstate Medical Center. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Marco M Ferrario, Paul Landsbergis, Akizumi Tsutsumi, Jian Li, Pikhart Hynek, Niklas Krause, Peter Smith, Andreas Holtermann, and Els Clays. Work environment: An opportunity for ground-breaking collaborations in cardiovascular disease prevention. European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, 2017; 24 (2_suppl): 4 DOI: 10.1177/2047487317698913

Cite This Page:

SUNY Downstate Medical Center. "Three types of work stress increasing in the US." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 24 May 2017. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/05/170524152641.htm>.
SUNY Downstate Medical Center. (2017, May 24). Three types of work stress increasing in the US. ScienceDaily. Retrieved February 24, 2024 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/05/170524152641.htm
SUNY Downstate Medical Center. "Three types of work stress increasing in the US." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/05/170524152641.htm (accessed February 24, 2024).

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